Search Results for: 2018 convention

Take a chance to win a new Luminex at the NCRA 2018 Convention & Expo

Attendees at the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo, being held Aug. 2-5 at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans, can take a chance at winning a one-of-a-kind Luminex shorthand machine, valued at more than $5,000 and generously donated by Stenograph for a raffle sponsored by the National Court Reporters Foundation.

Raffle tickets are $50 each or three for $125 and can be purchased at the NCRF booth on the Expo floor. The drawing will be held on Saturday, Aug. 4, at the Member Recognition Gala: Unmask Your Potential masquerade ball being hosted by 2018-2019 NCRA President Sue A. Terry, FAPR, RPR, CRC. The winner need not be present to win.

2018 Commemorative Pin

While visiting the NCRF booth, convention attendees will also learn how they can help the Association’s philanthropic arm do more through the many programs, scholarships, and grants it offers.

Other treasures that await at the NCRF booth include the 2018 New Orleans Jazz it Up Convention Commemorative Pin, which will be offered for $5 each, and an array of past convention pins available for $1 each. Visitors to the booth can also become part of NCRA history by signing the Official Convention Register, a time capsule of sorts that has documented convention attendees since the early 1900s and is housed in NCRF’s Robert H. Clark Library at NCRA headquarters between conventions.

Visitors to the NCRF booth can also be among the first of the many NCRA members who will commit to donate $1,000 or more to support the Foundation’s 2019 Angel Drive. The gift provides a great tax write-off and a myriad of benefits, including a listing on the Angels poster at the booth and an invitation to attend the exclusive VIP Luncheon next year in Denver, Colo.

Danielle Griffin

Finally, NCRF’s Corrinne Clark Professionalism Institute will host Beyond Your Career to Your Profession with presenters: Danielle C. Griffin, RPR; Rachel N. Barkume CSR, RPR; Andrea Couch, CSR, RDR, CRR, CRC; Shelley Duhon, RPR, and Jordan Groves, Montgomery, Ala.

Presenters will offer insight into how to expand your thinking to embrace your profession — a long-standing and proud one, at that. Every profession relies on its members to continue, grow, and to thrive. This session will help to get attendees to think about getting involved and to start thinking about their profession and not just their career.

If you are interested in taking a chance on the Luminex machine, snagging your New Orleans Convention pin, or becoming an Angel Donor, be sure to stop by the NCRF booth in New Orleans or contact April Weiner, Development Relations Manager, at aweiner@ncra.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo is the place to earn new certifications

Professionals seeking to add nationally recognized certifications to their résumés can choose from several opportunities to work toward them at the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo being held Aug. 2-5 at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans, in New Orleans, La.

This year’s scheduled event is all-inclusive, offering workshops, sessions, and Learning Zones sure to appeal to anyone working in the court reporting, captioning, or legal videography professions, and offering added opportunities for attendees to mingle and network.

Go for that certification

For those interested in learning how to pass the Certified Realtime Reporter (CRR), a three-hour-long boot camp is available on Aug. 2. The CRR is recognized in the industry as the national certification of realtime competency. Taught by Kathryn Sweeney, FAPR, RMR, CRR, who helped develop the boot camp program, the course has enabled many to successfully pass the test on the first take. Sweeney is a freelance reporter and agency owner from Acton, Mass.

In the course, Sweeney explains the testing requirements, covers NCRA’s What is an Error?, discusses what is not an error, and talks about the new online testing process. She also offers tips for self-preparation, including what to have on test day, what to do and not do on test day, and how and why candidates fail. Participants in the session should bring their equipment with them so they can take a couple of practice tests and learn how to adjust their system settings and dictionary entries. Skills testing for the CRR is offered online.

Going for the Certified Realtime Captioner (CRC) certification? There’s a 10-hour Workshop for this being held Aug. 2 and Aug. 3, and it’s the first step toward earning the CRC. The workshop will help prep you to be ready to take the Written Knowledge Test being offered at this year’s Convention & Expo. The required Skills Test can be taken anytime online.

Leading the CRC workshop are Carol Studenmund, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC, a broadcast captioner based in Portland, Ore., and Heidi Thomas, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC, a CART captioner from Acworth, Ga.

Attend the Certified Legal Video Specialist (CLVS) Certification Workshop on Aug. 4 for an overview of what it means to be a legal videographer. The workshop also includes a hands-on segment to help candidates better prepare to take the mandatory workshop offered online and the required in-person production exam held twice a year at NCRA Headquarters in Reston, Va.

The CLVS program sets and enforces standards for competency in the capture, use, and retention of legal video and promotes awareness of these standards within the legal marketplace.

Learning Zones

This year’s schedule also features an array of Learning Zones designed to appeal to attendees across the board. For example, current CLVSs are encouraged to attend the sessions Deposition Audio – Teamwork between the Court Reporter and Videographer, Market Yourself, and Adding PIP to your video deposition.

Students who attend will have the opportunity to participate in a Steno Speed Dating session, a special meet and greet with NCRA’s Board of Directors, an online skills testing prep, and hear from the perspective of a new professional what they didn’t learn in court reporting school.

Other Learning Zones feature business-related sessions such as Financial Wellness in the Gig Economy, Ethics Jeopardy, and Secrets to Success as a Freelancer.

NCRA’s 2018 Convention & Expo is the largest annual gathering of court reporters, captioners, scopists, legal videographers, trial presenters, students, and other legal services professionals.

Register now for the 2018 NCRA Annual Convention & Expo before July 23 to avoid late fees. Reserve a hotel room at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans using NCRA’s special discount rate by July 6 and get a free breakfast on Friday and Saturday (a $75 value).

To jazz things up even more, check out this party playlist of songs selected by NCRA staff to get everyone excited to meet in New Orleans!

For more information about the 2018 NCRA Annual Convention & Expo, or to register, visit NCRA.org/Convention.

For information about sponsorship opportunities, contact Mary Petto, Senior Director of External Affairs at mpetto@ncra.org.

 

 

2018 NCRA Convention & Expo student track sessions

Read the presenters bios here.

Steno Speed Dating

Steno Speed Dating (noun): An organized social activity in which students seeking information and networking opportunities have a series of short conversations with working reporters and captioners. This is a great opportunity to sit down and talk with professionals in a round of “Speed Dating.” You will have 10-15 minutes with each reporter or captioner to ask all the questions you have always wondered about. Find out what keeps these professionals motivated and passionate about their careers.

Presenters:  Ron Cook, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC, Rich Germosen, RMR, CRR, Karla Sommer, RMR, CRR, CRC, Melanie Humphrey-Sonntag, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC, Kathryn Thomas, RDR, CRR, CRC, Karen Tyler, RDR, CRR, CRC, Donna Urlaub, RMR, CRR, Doug Zweizig, RDR, CRR

Ron Cook, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC

Rich Germosen, RMR, CRR

Melanie Humphrey-Sonntag, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC

Kathryn Thomas photographed with Sen. Tom Harkin

Kathryn Thomas, RDR, CRR, CRC, photographed with Sen. Tom Harkin

Karen Tyler, RDR, CRR, CRC

Donna Urlaub, RMR, CRR

Doug Zweizig, RDR, CRR

 


What I didn’t learn in School: From the New Professionals’ Perspective – Do’s and Don’ts
You’ve just graduated from Court Reporting School and now you’re certified. Reality kicks in and you aren’t sure about the necessary steps for landing your first deposition or applying for an officialship. Does your resume stand out? Should you commit to one firm only? Is venting on social media a good idea? Come hear from a panel of stellar new professionals to learn all you need to know before entering the real world of reporting.

Presenters:  Aimee Edwards-Altadonna, Michael Hensley, RPR, Celeste Poppe, RPR, Isaiah Roberts, RPR, Katherine Schilling, RPR

Aimee Edwards-Altadonna

Michael Hensley, RPR

Celeste Poppe, RPR

Isaiah Roberts, RPR

Katherine Schilling, RPR

 


Good Reporter/Bad Reporter
This audience-participation skit touches on professional etiquette and mannerisms in conducting oneself at work. Learn the tools of the trade to win over clientele for freelance or get hired for overflow work in a judicial proceeding. Why some people “have it” and others just simply don’t. Be prepared to laugh!

Presenters:  Debbie Kriegshauser, FAPR, RMR, CRR, CLVS, CRC, Susan Moran, RMR

Deborah Kriegshauser, FAPR, RMR, CRR, CLVS

Susan Moran, RMR

 

 


Online Skills Testing

In this seminar, Marybeth Everhart will review the entire online testing process, from registration to completion – soup to nuts, you might say. What equipment will you need? Where can you test, and when? Who is ProctorU and how are they involved? For answers to these questions and more, you’ll want to attend this seminar!

Presenter:  Mary Beth Everhart, RPR, CRI, CPE

Marybeth Everhart, RPR, CRI, CPE

2018 NCRA Convention & Expo student track speaker bios

The following reporters and captioners will be speaking as part of the student track at the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo. The event will run Aug. 2-5 in New Orleans, La.

Read the session descriptions here.

Ron Cook, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC

Ron Cook is a veteran deposition reporter who owns his own agency in Seattle, Wash. He won the 2016 NCRA Realtime Contest Q&A leg and was one error away from being crowned the 2016 NCRA Realtime Champion.

 

Aimee Edwards-Altadonna

Aimee Edwards-Altadonna holds a Bachelor of Arts in Human Communications from California State University, Monterey Bay. She has been working as a freelance reporter covering Northern California since the fall of 2014. She has participated in state and national conventions as well as in software user groups for a number of years. She is proud to be involved as part of the volunteer leadership of California Court Reporters Association representing freelance reporters throughout the state.

 Marybeth Everhart, RPR, CRI, CPE

Marybeth Everhart has been reporting since 1980 and writing realtime since 1992. She has been a freelance reporter in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area; an official reporter in Brisbane, Australia; has provided CART services to such organizations as Self Help for Hard of Hearing People and the Neurofibromatosis Foundation; captioned for Gallaudet University; managed a large, multi-office freelance firm; taught court reporting at all levels; and trained on numerous CAT systems over the years. Everhart is now the national marketing manager for Realtime Coach and works closely with reporting schools, firms, and court systems to increase speed and improve accuracy for students and working reporters. Everhart is as a contributing editor to the JCR (Journal of Court Reporting) and the Eclipse Users Group Newscache.

 Rich Germosen, RMR, CRR

Rich Germosen is a Certified Realtime Reporter with more than 24 years of experience covering high-end realtime assignments nationwide, especially in New York City, New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Washington, D.C. He holds the NCRA Realtime Systems Administrator certificate. Hehas consistently qualified in the NCRA National Speed and Realtime Competitions from 2012 through 2016, and in 2016, he received a 3rd place medal in the Deposition Reporters Association Realtime Contest in the 190 wpm Q&A.

Michael Hensley, RPR

Michael Hensley joined the profession of court reporting in a somewhat unique way. His schooling was done entirely online. Not once did he set foot in a classroom at a brick-and-mortar facility. His education provided him with a unique perspective relating to the court reporting education process that allows him to embrace technology in every aspect of his career. In his experience as a reporter, he has covered various types of proceedings including depositions for cases involving wrongful death, patent law, medical practice, and technical expert testimony. Hensley is a member of NCRA’s New Professionals Advisory Committee, which advocates for involvement in local and national associations as well as certification and professional development. He finds joy in giving back to the profession of court reporting by encouraging other reporters to continually sharpen their skills and by offering guidance and education for various technologies available to professional court reporters and students alike.

Melanie Humphrey-Sonntag, FAPR, RDR, CRR, CRC

Melanie Humphrey-Sonntag has lived and breathed reporting since she discovered the profession as a junior in high school. It is the only career she has ever had, and in her more than 35 years of reporting she has worked as an official, freelancer, firm owner, and occasional CART captioner. She has served on many committees and boards, including as president of the Wyoming, Colorado, and National Court Reporter Associations. She is a perennial contestant in state and national speed and realtime contests, having placed as high as 2nd in NCRA’s Speed Contest twice. She has also won the Colorado and Illinois contests numerous times. She has given seminars to students, reporters, vendors, and the public since 1993. She currently serves on the Advisory Board for MacCormac College, in Chicago, Ill., the nation’s oldest reporting program. In 2015, Humphrey-Sonntag transitioned to Planet Depos, an international reporting firm. She is now a full-time realtime reporter in the firm’s Chicagoland branch, where she loves interacting with attorneys in the field and reporting varied and interesting cases.

Debbie Kriegshauser, FAPR, RMR, CRR, CLVS, CRC

Debbie Kriegshauser is currently a federal official reporter with the U.S. District Court in St. Louis, Mo. She has been a reporter since 1980 and has worked in all phases of the reporting profession. She also has served on numerous national and state committees, including her current service on NCRA’s Test Advisory Council.

 

Susan Moran, RMR

Susan Moran has been a federal official in St. Louis, Mo. for 20 years. Prior to that, she worked as a freelancer for four years. She received her RPR in 1992 and her RMR in 1999. In 2005, Moran received the FCRR (Federal Realtime Reporter) designation.

 

Celeste Poppe, RPR

Celeste Poppe is a freelance deposition reporter in California. She received her California license in February  2017 and received her RPR shortly after that in April 2017. Before becoming licensed, Poppe was an office manager at a small CSR-owned agency that gave her great insight into what agencies expect out of reporters and also what drives them crazy. She volunteers her time to students and new professionals in guiding them to be successful reporters. She also serves on event committees for the California Deposition Reporters Association and volunteers as a subject matter expert for the written exams with the California Court Reporters Board. She has also been published in the JCR (Journal of Court Reporting).

Isaiah Roberts, RPR

Isaiah Roberts is currently an official reporter in the 11th Judicial Circuit of Illinois. After obtaining his Bachelor’s degree in Business Marketing from Illinois State University in 2013, Roberts attended the Mark Kislingbury Academy of Court Reporting before starting his job as an official in April of 2016. He currently serves as the Legislative Representative for the Illinois Court Reporters Association and is an avid member of NCRA.

Katherine Schilling, RPR

Court reporting is Katherine Schilling’s second career, after having spent seven years as a translator of Japanese comics and video games in Los Angeles, Calif., and the Silicon Valley. After three years at West Valley College’s court reporting program and still with her qualifier to pass, Katherine opted instead to work under a one-year contract across the country in Richmond, Va., where a few months of experience under her belt helped her to pass the RPR, followed shortly thereafter by the California CSR. Schilling loved working in the Washington, D.C., area where she considered every day on the job to be a “waking dream.” At her two-year anniversary as a working reporter, she had the opportunity to marry her love of court reporting and Japanese culture by relocating to Tokyo, Japan – a lifelong dream of hers. There she has been taking realtime depositions in Japan and throughout Asia.

Karla Sommer, RMR, CRR, CRC

Karla Sommer has been a court reporter in the Wausau, Wis. area for the past 32 years. She began her career as a freelance reporter. After five years of freelancing, Sommer was appointed as an official reporter for the state of Wisconsin, a position she has held for 27 years. She has also worked as a part-time captioner, and she continues to provide CART services when needed. Sommer holds the Registered Merit Reporter, Certified Realtime Reporter, and Certified Realtime Captioner certifications. She is currently the past president of the Wisconsin Court Reporters Association and is serving on NCRA’s Nominating Committee as well as the Association’s Skills Writing Committee.

Kathryn Thomas, RDR, CRR, CRC

Kathryn A. Thomas is a captioner in the greater St. Louis, Mo., area and is currently president of the Illinois Court Reporters Association. She provides captioning to individuals, stadiums, webcasts, conventions, and wherever it’s needed.

Karen Tyler, RDR, CRR, CRC

Karen Tyler has worked as an official court reporter in state and federal courts in Shreveport, La., and as a freelance reporter. She became a firm owner in 1994 and then transitioned to the Western District of Louisiana. Tyler assisted in setting up the first paperless and realtime-ready courtroom in northern Louisiana in 1998. After bombing the infamous NCRA Speed and Realtime Contests held in Dallas, Texas, she garnered her courage and competed again in 2013, where she qualified in all three legs, and won second in the Q&A, and also qualified in both legs of the realtime contest. In 2014, she qualified in all three legs of the speed contest, won third in the literary, and qualified in both legs of the realtime contest. In 2015, she qualified in all three legs of the speed contest, and in 2016, she won third overall in the speed contest, second place in the Q&A, and qualified in realtime Q&A. Tyler is the owner of Karen Tyler Reporting in Shreveport, La.

Donna Urlaub, RMR, CRR

Donna Urlaub has been working as a court reporter for 49 years and also owns her own agency. She was an Illinois speed and realtime champion in 2013, 2015, and in 2017. She has been a perennial medalist in NCRA’s speed and realtime contests and won third place at Intersteno in 2015. Urlaub has been a presenter at NCRA, the Illinois Court Reporters Association, and STAR.

Doug J. Zweizig, RDR, CRR

Douglas J. Zweizig is a 1989 graduate of Central Pennsylvania Business School (now Central Pennsylvania College). Zweizig earned his Associate’s degree and moved from a small town to Philadelphia, Pa., where he began work as a freelance court reporter. Initially covering car accidents and workers’ compensation matters, he worked his way up to medical malpractice, public hearings, and more. A limited amount of CART work was interspersed in those years, something he found most rewarding. In 2001, Zweizig began as an official court reporter in the Court of Common Pleas in Philadelphia. He covered a wide range of work including drug cases, assaults, and especially homicide trials. On the civil side, he covered medical malpractice, mass tort pharmaceutical cases, construction, and discrimination. After many rewarding years there, he accepted a position in the U. S. District Court for the District of Maryland, where he’s currently working. There he handles criminal matters, including large drug conspiracies, racketeering, bank fraud, and occasionally a murder trial. On the civil side, he covers patent cases, maritime, discrimination, and more. Zweizig has several medals in speed and realtime contests, winning NCRA’s Realtime Contest in 2006 and 2015.

PAC Your Baskets: NCRA PAC Fundraiser at 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo

Contributing to the NCRA PAC (Political Action Committee) is an important way you can shape how the court reporting and captioning professions are addressed at the federal level. That makes this year more important than ever. With the 2018 midterm elections coming up, NCRA has an opportunity to cultivate new alliances in the federal government and to ensure that members of Congress who know the importance of court reporters and support the court reporting profession in the United States stay in office.

To raise PAC funds to help our allies in Congress in 2018, NCRA PAC is holding a Gift Basket Extravaganza at this year’s 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo in New Orleans. We are asking our state associations to donate a gift basket to NCRA PAC. Ideally, a gift basket would showcase the uniqueness of your state and your association’s pride in it! Each state that contributes a gift basket will be entered into a drawing for a chance to win a free registration to the 2019  NCRALegislative Boot Camp.

Here’s how it works: Each state association that donates a gift basket has a chance to win a registration to the 2019 NCRA Legislative Boot Camp. Which state wins the NCRA Legislative Boot Camp registration is based on which basket is the biggest draw at Convention. Convention attendees who contribute to NCRA PAC in exchange for raffle tickets will vote by putting their raffle tickets in a bowl for the basket they want to win. If donors want your state’s basket, they will put their tickets in the bowl, and the winner of the basket will be chosen randomly. The basket that accumulates the highest number of tickets wins the 2019 NCRA Legislative Boot Camp registration.

If you have any questions about the 2018 NCRA PAC Gift Basket Extravaganza, contact Matthew Barusch at mbarusch@ncra.org.

Registration is open for 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo

Registration is now open for the NCRA 2018 Convention & Expo taking place Aug. 2-5 at the Hyatt Regency in New Orleans, La. The 2018 event coincides with the celebration of the Tricentennial of New Orleans, which carries the theme “One Time in New Orleans” and encourages residents and visitors to write their stories about their time in the city.

The Convention Keynote speaker is Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré (U.S. Army, Ret.). Honoré, a 37-year veteran of active service, served as the commander of Joint Task Force Katrina, during which time he became known as the “Category 5 General” for his striking leadership style in coordinating military relief efforts in post-hurricane New Orleans.

This year’s convention also features a lineup of sessions presented by top leaders in the court reporting, captioning, and legal videography fields. Some of those include the CLVS Certification Workshop, featuring the Intro to CLVS and CLVS Hands-on Training, the Punctuation Workshop, and the ever-popular CRR Boot Camp. Throughout the Convention attendees can earn up to 2.3 CEUs.

Other exciting events that are expected to sell out quickly include the CRC Workshop, the annual Realtime and Speed Contests, and the new Member Recognition Gala that promises a wonderful night of dinner, drinks, dancing, and celebrating NCRA members.

In addition, this year’s VIP upgrade registration includes a ticket to a VIP reception being hosted by 2018-2019 President Sue A. Terry, FAPR, RPR, CRR, CRC, from Springfield, Ohio, and VIP seating at the Member Recognition Gala.

As always, there will be a number of networking opportunities, including receptions, luncheons, and special events on the Expo floor, where vendors will showcase the latest in products and services for the court reporting, captioning, and legal videography professions.

“One of the biggest reasons I attend the Convention is for the opportunity to meet and talk to reporters from around the country,” said Susan M. Hora, RDR, CRR, an official court reporter from Columbus, Ohio. “I have learned that we experience the same issues and we can strategize together on overcoming those issues. It reminds me that I am not alone in this profession. It reinvigorates my spirit.”

Join other court reporting professionals from around the country and abroad for the 2018 NCRA Annual Convention & Expo. The NCRA Convention & Expo is the largest annual gathering of court reporters, captioners, scopists, legal videographers, trial presenters, students, and other legal services professionals.

For more information about the NCRA 2018 Convention & Expo, or to register, visit NCRA.org/Convention. Register before July 20 to avoid late fees. Attendees are also encouraged to reserve hotel rooms for the Convention at the Hyatt Regency New Orleans.

For sponsorship information please contact Mary Petto, Senior Director of External Affairs, at mpetto@ncra.org

HLAA members embrace NCRA at annual convention

Marcia Ferranto

Attendees at the 2018 Hearing Loss Association of America’s (HLAA) annual convention held June 21-24 in Minneapolis, Minn., welcomed NCRA as an exhibitor to the event and shared with Executive Director and CEO Marcia Ferranto how much they appreciated the services of captioners and CART providers.

“Working with the end user of CART captioning was an enriching experience, and many of them shared with me their love for the service and their willingness to help advance the profession,” Ferranto said.

Ferranto also held a breakout session onsite where she explained to attendees how NCRA is working toward attracting more people into the profession. She also shared that NCRA members who are CART captioners represent the highest standard of skill and excellence in the profession. Ferranto also offered information about what is involved in becoming and working as a CART captioner, how NCRA is the national certifying body, and why users should be looking for NCRA certifications when hiring a provider.

“Marcia’s presentation on the future of CART captioning was very well-received and shed light on how NCRA is working with HLAA to raise awareness of and to proliferate CART captioning,” said Matthew R. Barusch, NCRA’s Manager of State Government Relations, who also attended the event.

Overall, said Barusch, the whole experience was a huge success and was a prime example of the importance of working with the deaf and hard-of hearing community. People with hearing disabilities are the main consumers of CART captioning services, and they value and appreciate the services that NCRA members provide, he added. Working with HLAA to enhance and protect captioning and captioning policy cultivates a huge population of advocates for NCRA members and, ultimately, will make NCRA stronger.

According to Barusch, there was a huge interest by attendees in the NCRA Sourcebook, since so many attendees were interested in finding CART captioners in their area. In addition, he noted that many chapter leaders thanked NCRA for its new partnership with HLAA, which is helping to identify and provide CART captioning to their members.

Left to right: Matt Barusch, Caitlin Albrecht, Merilee Johnson, Jennifer Sati

“We could not be more thankful to HLAA for putting on such a great convention, and to our wonderful volunteers, who represented in such an amazing way,” Barusch shared.

NCRA Board of Directors member Jennifer Sati, RMR, CRR, CRC, CRI, from Dayton, Minn., assisted in recruiting a number of volunteers to demonstrate captioning at the NCRA booth. Those volunteers included:

  • Caitlin Albrecht, a freelance court reporter from Plymouth, Minn.
  • Kristi Arntzen, RPR, CRR, a captioner from St. Louis Park, Minn.
  • Elizabeth Gangl, RPR, a freelance court reporter from Minneapolis, Minn.
  • Staci Heichert, RDR, CRR, CRC, a captioner from Shakopee, Minn.
  • Merilee Johnson, RDR, CRR, CRC, a captioner from Eden Prairie, Minn.
  • Heather Schuetz, RMR, CRR, CRC, a freelance court reporter from Woodbury, Minn.
  • Angie Sundell, RMR, CRR, CRC, a captioner from Hopkins, Minn.
  • Jean Whalen, RDR, CRR, CRC, a captioner from Apple Valley, Minn.

“I want to give a shout-out to Marcia on her presentation at HLAA. I was lucky enough to be in the audience since it was in my neck of the woods. She has such a talent at engaging the audience, and they were engaged! I never tire of hearing CART captioning consumers express how much they love NCRA and their captioners,” Sati shared with members of NCRA’s BOD.

“Seeing us in action this weekend, I think this is a must to continue with our participation at HLAA each year to take advantage of the exposure and opportunities,” she added.

“Engaging in professional relationships with like-minded organizations such as HLAA not only showcases the services our members provide to assist members of the deaf and hard-of-hearing communities, but it also creates a strong bond and vital support for our common issues,” Ferranto added.

Dreaming of earning the CRC? Convention is the place

Realtime captioning is an in-demand skill for court reporters. Earning the CRC will allow those who possess it to present themselves as among the most elite and qualified captioners.

The two-day workshop followed by the Written Knowledge Test will be offered again this year at the NCRA Convention & Expo. Attendees will learn how to perfect the set-up and operation of their equipment, convert their files to ASCII text files, and gain a solid foundation for understanding what it takes to be a captioner.

To fully earn the CRC, candidates must complete three steps:

  1. Attend the CRC Workshop which is offered Thursday and Friday, Aug. 2 and 3.
  2. Take the CRC Skills Test (literary matter at 180 wpm), which is offered online and can be taken anytime.
  3. Take the written knowledge test (50 questions), which can be taken at Convention following the CRC Workshop or at a Pearson VUE testing center in October (registration opens in September).

Online registration for Convention ends on July 23, but the CRC Workshop and on-site CRC Written Knowledge Test are expected to sell out before then. Register today!

 

Don’t miss out on Convention this year

Need a reason to attend the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo this year? Read what previous attendees have to say about their experiences, what they’ve learned, and why convention is the one event you don’t want to miss this year.

Members of NCRA’s Student/Teacher Committee, Callie Sajdera, a student at Anoka Technical College in Anoka, Minn., Gayl Hardeman, RDR, CRR, CRC, CRI, instructor at Hardeman School, Kay Moody, MCRI, CPE, instructor at College of Court Reporting in Valparaiso, Ind., Len Sperling, CRI, instructor at Northern Alberta Institute of Technology in Alberta, Canada, Whitney Berndt, a student at Lakeshore Technical College in Cleveland, Wis., and Shaunise Day, a student at West Valley College in Oakland, Calif., offer their thoughts and advice for attending convention.

JCR | Did you attend an NCRA convention as a student? What was that experience like?

Callie | I did attend conventions as a student, and I am still a student. My experiences have been nothing short of amazing. It is a great way for students and professionals to start creating their “webs” and growing connections all across the Unites States.

Whitney | Yes. It was an experience unlike any other. I truly wish I would have gone sooner into my time as a student. Everyone was so encouraging, willing to answer any questions, and sincere. I was lucky that a reporter from my home state, Chris Willette, was becoming the President of NCRA. This made the experience even more memorable. Watching someone so near and dear to your state organization receive one of the greatest honors in a reporter’s career was something I will never forget.

Shaunise | Yes. I have attended several conventions as a student and each time has been amazing. The experience has allowed me to get out of my comfort zone when it comes to networking. Prior to my first convention, when it came to meeting new people, I would be somewhat shy and nervous. The convention held in San Francisco, Calif. allowed me to make a change and take the limits off when it came to making new connections. This has been one of the best social decisions I could have made for myself.

JCR | If you are planning to go to convention this year, what do you hope to get out of it?

Callie | This year I hope I will be out of school and into my professional career. I hope I can attend more software seminars and workshops, along with meeting new people and continuing to grow my contacts for the future.

Kay | I love seeing our students. They’re all over the country and being an online program, we have the opportunity to meet present and past students face-to-face for the first time!

Whitney | Yes. I hope to be attending this year’s convention as my first as a working reporter. I hope to gain some confidence and insight into what my first year will be like.

Shaunise | After every convention I walk away feeling inspired and motivated. I’m sure this year’s convention will provide the same exact thing.

JCR | Is there anything else about convention you would like to share with the students?

Callie | Going to the convention as a student was something I looked forward to every year, and will continue to do so as a professional. The convention always gave me a rejuvenating feeling and motivated me to push myself through school. Whenever I am running low on motivation, it seems to be just around convention time!

Gayl | GO! Meet the stars. Be inspired. Network. Take cards, even if it’s only your name and email address and area of the country. Gosh, years ago we used to call them “calling cards.” Be creative! Attend every seminar you can and take notes. Be the knowledge sponge! Hope to meet you there next year!

Kay | When you go to convention, network. Of course, you’ll meet other students; be sure to keep in contact with them. Make a point to meet the officers, board members, agency owners, CART reporters, captioners, etc.—all the people you read about in the Journal of Court Reporting! Meet and talk to as many people as possible. Be sure to tell them you’re a student, when you anticipate you’ll be finished with school, and that you’d like to keep in contact with them and visit with the ones near you. You will meet reporters who want to be your mentor, receive job offers, and get lots of great advice. Be sure to get everyone’s business card, and make notes of your conversations with them. Talk to ALL of the vendors and have them demonstrate their products. Go to as many sessions as possible, even the ones that aren’t part of the student seminar, and definitely attend all the social events. New Orleans is a great city, but go sightseeing before and after the convention—don’t miss a single thing at the convention!

Len | If you have the opportunity to attend, please do so. Every time I attend an NCRA event I get inspired and it refreshes me. I am sure it will do the same for you as a student.

Whitney | Go! Register! Make the leap. It is one, I promise, you won’t regret. The connections you make and friendships you gain are unlike any others. It will give you a new sense of drive when it comes to finishing school.

Shaunise | Yes. Be sure to attend all of the student sessions, make business cards, network, and be ready to have a good time!

2018 class of Fellows of the Academy of Professional Reporters announced

NCRA has announced the 2018 class of Fellows of the Academy of Professional Reporters. The recipients will be recognized during an Awards Luncheon at the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo in New Orleans, La., being held Aug. 2-5.

The 2018 class of Fellows are:

  • Mary P. Bader, RPR, an official court reporter from Eau Claire, Wis.
  • Allison A. Kimmel, RDR, CRR, CRC, an official court reporter and broadcast captioner from Marysville, Ohio
  • Donna Karoscik, RDR, CRR, CRC, a freelance court reporter from Pickerington, Ohio
  • Jen Krueger, RMR, CRI, CPE, a freelance court reporter and instructor from Strongsville, Ohio
  • Yolanda Walton, RPR, an official court reporter from Norwalk, Ohio

Membership in the Academy symbolizes excellence among NCRA members. The designation of FAPR represents an individual’s dedication to the court reporting and captioning professions and expresses the highest level of professional ethics.

To be nominated for membership in the Academy, candidates must be a Registered Member of NCRA with at least 10 years of professional experience and have attained distinction as measured by performance in at least three of the five performance categories. This performance could include publication of important papers, creative contributions, service on committees or boards, teaching, and more.