The latest must-have gadget in the court reporter arsenal

The JCR provides newsworthy information on reporter-related products and technologies. This column is for readers to use in their research; neither NCRA nor the JCR endorse or critically review these products and services in any way. Statements of fact or opinion are the author’s unless they are specifically identified as NCRA policy.

 

Drumroll, please … USB! But it’s not your ordinary USB: SanDisk has released its “SanDisk Connect Wireless Flash Drive.” Here are a few of its features:

  • Wirelessly store, share, and stream movies, photos, music, and documents across your smartphones, tablets, and computers.
  • Simultaneously connect and access data stored on up to eight devices via Wi-Fi.
  • Works for up to four hours of video streaming on a single charge.
  • Use a free app (compatible with iOS 5.0 or later, Android 2.3 or later, and Kindle devices) to connect without an Internet connection, cables, or router; works on all Wi-Fi enabled devices.
  • Access also available through an Internet browser, compatible with all Wi-Fi enabled devices.
  • Charge and access with USB 2.0 connection interface or higher.
  • Uses optional Wi-Fi password protection and 128-bit AES encryption.

16GB $49.99

32GB $59.99

Wireless Flash pic

Christine Phipps, RPR, is an agency owner in West Palm Beach, Fla., and a member of NCRA’s Technology Review Committee.

End cord terror

The JCR provides newsworthy information on reporter-related products and technologies. This column is for readers to use in their research; neither NCRA nor the JCR endorse or critically review these products and services in any way. Statements of fact or opinion are the author’s unless they are specifically identified as NCRA policy.

 

“Where is my cord?”
“Which one is which?”
If you have ever asked yourself these questions, then Recoil Winders is your must-have product!

Recoil Winders end the age-old problem of tangled, lost, and unidentifiable cords and cables once and for all. This cord organizer can finally solve cord clutter. Recoil Winders makes it easy to find, store, and organize all of the cords you carry. No more searching for the right charging cord or forgetting which cord belongs to which device; just label the face of the Recoil Winder with the name of the device for matching purposes. In addition, Recoil Winders prevent cords from getting tangled, bent, or torn from lack of a proper storage solution. This easy-to-use cord management tool makes earbuds or any other cord retractable.

Recoil Winders

More information can be found in this video: www.youtube.com/watch?v=_RN36N-y57M 57M

Three recoil devices and stand priced as low as $13.99.
www.recoilwinders.com

 

Christine Phipps, RPR, is an agency owner in West Palm Beach, Fla., and a member of NCRA’s Technology Review Committee.

Product review: connection magic

As I was working as a reporter for a new trial recently, I had a scopist reviewing my realtime through Connection Magic. After I gave her the file name and password for the day, she connected in through the Eclipse CM and edited as I wrote for the morning session–170 pages from 9:40 a.m. until 1 p.m.. As I wrote, my scopist made dictionary entries that went right into my job dictionary locally.  Throughout the day, I could see where she was in the document, and we were able to chat via text from within Eclipse.

When I closed out at 1 p.m., she was 40 pages behind me, and those 40 pages were completed by the time my afternoon began. When I was finished with the morning session, I waited not even two minutes before closing out of Eclipse, which then booted her out of my local document. I called her on the phone to see where she was and what happened on her end. She scrolled to the end and had the full document and the full audio file on her computer locally. At the time I called her, my local document was edited to the 12:15 p.m. spot.

The scopist and I shared a simultaneous stream. Not once did we lose connection, and I was on the 11th floor of a courthouse, working off my Mifi that wasn’t plugged in, and streaming to Bridge Mobile realtime. After nearly seven hours, we are both amazed at what we were able to do. With the help of my scopist, the realtime output was flawless; it was truly an instant, clean rough draft. I can envision CM helping reporters increase the quality of their realtime so that reporters who want to give out realtime but don’t write under 1 percent untranslate rate can offer that same quality.

In the past when I tried systems that connected me to a scopist, I felt a drag on the keyboard or the cursor, which made me just want to get out of the shared link. I couldn’t stand the delay of waiting for the change to occur. With CM, my scopist was editing at a high rate with no drag at all because she is really editing on a document local to her that’s affecting me simultaneously. When I watched her on my break, I could tell she was going at a good clip.

Another factor I like is its simplicity. The only thing I’m doing in addition to starting a file, which I do every day anyway, is clicking one box on the translate screen. There, I give the file a different name for my scopist. When prompted, I create the password for the day. That’s it: I’m done.

Another distinction of Connection Magic is I still have control of my own document and can go and make changes while my scopist is also working on the same document. I can also have one person scoping and another proofreading or two people scoping and one proofreading and I can make corrections still–all simultaneous.

Tech Wire: Speedtest.net review

Have you ever wondered if your computer upload/download speed was slow? I found this website, speedtest.net, a sophisticated broadband testing and analysis tool, and it showed me just how connected I actually was.

For example, I was transferring about 150 small files to a new computer via Dropbox, a cloud-based sharing site, and it just slowed everything down, including incoming email attachments. The speed in my SysTray was indicating 2kbps; however, since I was at home on my wireless, it shouldn’t be this slow. I ran speedtest.net and it showed me that my speeds were 2.10/1.99mbps respectively, not what my normal rates are. The problem was that the large number of files placed in Dropbox was maxing out my bandwidth, which was greatly decreasing my Internet speeds. The thing is that I was still able to deduce that I indeed was connected and these are the rates. I thought it was amazing that it even told me who the Internet Service Provider (ISP) was and the IP address, which can come in handy when streaming. This site even comparatively analyzes, via a grading system, your connection with others around the world.

This tool should actually be used on a fairly consistent basis and it will keep track of each time you test your computer, this is so you will know what your norm is, and then when things have slowed down, you can go to the next steps to diagnose your problem. Another reason to do this is because you can go to your ISP and see if you are actually getting the promised rates, and if you’re not, you can report your test results and the ISP will then have to analyze and improve your connection. Also, with many ISPs, you can purchase faster connections by opting to pay more.