TechLinks: The 21st century reporter, part 1

TechLinks_logoOn behalf of the NCRA Technology Committee, Robin Nodland, FAPR, RDR, CRR, recently shared a series of links with information to help the 21st-century reporter or captioner. This first installment covers ethics and cybersecurity, a tech gadget, and a data-storage solution.

In the July 2017 GPSolo eReport for the American Bar Association (ABA), lawyers Al Harrison and Joseph Jacobson talk about what ransomware is, how it can affect your computer, and how to deal with it ethically. “Often portrayed as attacking an operating system such as Windows or Mac OS, ransomware is, unfortunately, more sophisticated and more destructive than you may perceive from a cursory review of reported invasive malware events,” Harrison and Jacobson say. This is the first in a series on cloud computing and ethics. GPSolo is the solo, small firm, and general practice division of the ABA.

In a July 20 post for PCMag, William Harrel reviews the Xerox Duplex Travel Scanner. “There are some other much more sophisticated portable document scanners out there, such as the $300 Epson WorkForce ES-300W Portable Wireless Duplex Document Scanner, but if all you need is to scan relatively short documents to your laptop on the road, the Duplex Travel Scanner is a terrific alternative to the RoadWarrior X3—especially if those documents are two-sided,” says Harrel.

A July 17 post on How-To Geek by Jason Fitzpatrick discusses how to set up a Synology Network Attached Storage (NAS) device. “A NAS, simply put, is a computer optimized for data storage, often with additional functionality layered on top,” explains Fitzpatrick. In the post, Fitzpatrick goes through the physical setup – including hard-drive selection, how to add the drives, and where to put a NAS – how to configure the NAS, and how to use the DiskStation Manager (with screenshots!).

Blog breaks down voice recognition

JCR: Journal of Court Reporting, TheJCR.com, JCR WeeklyA recent blog posted by Cleveland Reporting Partners offers a comprehensive break down and comparison of voice recognition versus a live court reporter.

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TechLinks: All about Apple

TechLinks_logoApple products continue to be in the news, and the NCRA Technology Committee shared a number of links on the latest information on upcoming releases as well as tips for getting the most out of your current system.

A public beta release of Apple’s iOS 11 release came out last week, and early adopters are testing it out. Teresa Russ, CRI, shared an article from Apple that gives you the rundown of what to expect. The article covers a few of the features, such as a new Advanced Apple Maps and the “Do Not Disturb” mode for driving, as well as a complete list of computer compatibility. A final version is expected to roll out this fall.

On a more practical note, Russ also shared a how-to for scanning documents using the Notes App in iOS 11.

If you’re a Mac user, like Lisa Knight, FAPR, RDR, CRR, you have many choices for apps. An article by MacWorld.com listed 25 free apps, with suggestions like Audacity, an app that boosts efficiency using hotkeys and keywords, and Wunderlist, an app that allows you to share your to-do list across almost any system.

If you just need to keep up with the nomenclature for iPhones, iDropNews offered an overview of how Apple has been naming their smartphones and gave some clues for what to expect down the line.

Blog warns court reporters about Windows 10 updates

JCR: Journal of Court Reporting, TheJCR.com, JCR WeeklyJD Supra posted a blog on June 29 warning court reporters that new Windows updates could wreak havoc on their computer settings. The blog offers several tips for dealing with updates.

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TechLinks: Understanding internet safety

TechLinks_logoThe JCR Weekly recently asked the NCRA Technology Committee: “What are your thoughts, concerns, or sources you turn to when you are looking at your settings – whether your browser, apps or programs you download, or dealing with the upload of transcripts?” Here’s what they had to say:

 

My general privacy settings are set in my virus ware, but I am very careful about downloading any attachment with an .exe extension on it. I make sure I’m confident with the source, whether a new program or the person who has sent it, before I click “OK.”

I have, in the past, gone to Google to check out the source of the program if it’s an app or new software I’m downloading. I read quite a bit about Dashlane, for example, before I decided to use that as my password keeper, including talking to my IT guy, my nephew Dan, and I’m so very glad I did.

Nancy Bistany, RPR
Chicago, Ill.

 

I am very careful as to what I download. If I don’t know the site or the user, I just delete and don’t click on anything that would say, “download” or have an extension on it.

I stick with using Google Chrome because it is more secure. Here at work, though, we are not allowed to open certain things. We’ll get a “caution” before we proceed or it will block us from opening untrusted sites or downloads. I think it goes back to again having a trusted virus ware to help with that as well. Here at work, they send us emails to test us to see how many people will fall for opening these downloads that would cause a virus. So we are constantly being educated from our IT people on what to look for. If we open something here at work, we will be shut down immediately or contacted immediately to let us know our computers are at risk.

On my personal computer, same thing, I just wouldn’t open it. I would email the person back if I know who it is and let them know to resend it in a different format.

But once again, if I don’t know the person sending something or the site, I’d just rather avoid. When in doubt, you click on Google and search. Nowadays there’s so much information on the internet, there’s no reason you can’t Google things and find an answer. It may not always be the right answer — that’s why you look at several searches before deciding which is the right answer.

Jamie R. Lopez, RPR
Roswell, N.M.

 

I use Ghostery for browsing the internet. Sometimes I have to “Pause Blocking” on a particular page I may be viewing because it won’t load pictures, but at least I get to choose. I also use Adguard.

Lisa Knight, FAPR, RDR, CRR
Littleton, Colo.

 

Regarding uploading of transcripts to the Web:

1)         There are programs that incorporate username/password, or just password, that is passed on from the uploader to the uploadee. It does make the receiver feel more secure if you convey a password in a separate email.

2)         There are programs where the uploaded document will expire. This needs to be conveyed to the receiver that they need to download the transcript before the period ends and the link becomes invalid.

3)         For even more security, you could use a program such as 7-Zip that encrypts the actual file, which then requires a password, but I would think this would be overkill for just a regular deposition transcript.

Dana Hayden, RMR, CRR
Fayetteville, Ark.

 

Our IT company, who is a Google house, handles our privacy as well as any updates and/or settings. It’s worth it to us to have our IT experts assess our requirements, and then build privacy and security around those requirements as a court reporting firm. We’ve also asked all of our contractors (reporters and videographers) to use Gmail/Google so we all use the same tunnel through the internet. That way we can share knowing, via email or Drive, we are protected. Or as protected as we can be since occasionally people click on links or download items that infect their systems but, knock on wood, none of those threats have made its way back to us, but it slows those infected down for days and/or weeks.

Jon Moretti, CLVS
Kalamazoo, Mich.

TechLinks: Travel apps

By Jennifer Late and Susie Simmons

TechLinks_logoThe Technology Committee recently shared a number of travel apps designed to make your travel easier whether your journey takes you across the state or around the globe.

Lisa Knight, FAPR, RDR, CRR, says there are several travel apps that she can’t live without.

  • Google Maps: This app works without being on WiFi. You can still see where you are on the map.
  • Uber: This is a great way to get a ride anywhere.
  • Converter: I love this app. It converts the currency. I use this daily when traveling abroad.
  • Expensify: This helps manage my expenses, and it creates and sends an expense report.

Nancy Bistany, RPR, uses WorldMate to store all her airfare items and hotel, and it’s even a currency converter.

Robin Nodland, FAPR, RDR, CRR, has several favorites:

  • Outlook: When traveling, I copy and paste my itinerary into the calendar and save all confirming emails to the travel folder for airlines, hotels, rental cars, etc. The paperless boarding pass can be saved to the travel folder, too.
  • Dropbox: I scan my passport, driver’s license, health insurance card, and credit cards, and I keep in a secure folder in Dropbox in case of emergency.
  • Splashtop: This gives me access my office desktop computer from my Android.
  • MyTSA: This gives real-time conditions of TSA lines at any airport in the country.

For a full list of travel apps that our technology committee members use and love, click here.

TechLinks: Helpful products

TechLinks_logoRecently, the NCRA Technology Committee has shared a few products that can help with work tasks. The products include a password management system, an education technology tool, a messaging app, and an audio solution.

Nancy Bistany, RPR, shared a blog post by Dashlane on the worldwide password problem: internet users’ tendency toward “using the same, easy-to-remember password on all of their accounts over the security of using strong, unique passwords on all of their accounts.” Dashlane is a password manager that can also manage other security-sensitive information, like IDs and credit card numbers. “I use Dashlane for my Level 1 Password user,” says Bistany. “Their reminders are great.”

Bistany also shared an article from Forbes reviewing Learning Tools for OneNote. Microsoft OneNote is a now well-known note-keeping program, and Learning Tools is an ancillary product. According to the article, “Learning Tools for OneNote was originally created for dyslexics … [that leverages] a variety of already existing Microsoft technologies like Bing’s speech recognition, simultaneous audio text playback, and natural language processing … to make reading and writing more accessible to all students.” One of its features is fluent fonts, which allows “readers to adjust both the letter spacing and the number of words on the line.”

Teresa Russ, CRI, shared a link on the messaging app Slack. According to the company, it’s “oriented toward small-team collaboration” and has both a free and premium version. Chase Frazier, RMR, CRR, CRC, explained, “I use Slack to talk to a captioning team that we do a lot of events together with. All or most of the tech companies use Slack to communicate. It has awesome searching capabilities, and you can tag someone in the conversation to bring it to their attention.” Frazier added that he has his own name set as a tag so he gets an alert when the conversation involves him.

Finally, Robin Nodland, FAPR, RDR, CRR, shared a review of Trint, an audio and transcription app. Nodland pointed out a quote from the article that explains that Trint makes “it easy to compare the audio clips to the transcript as you’re verifying and editing it.”

What to do with those old steno machines

Steno machines are no different than anything else in life. At some point, they need to be replaced. But what’s a reporter or captioner to do with their old machines? For some, the answer is to donate them to a court reporting program.

Three 1980s models of steno machines grouped together“A donated machine is very much appreciated by a student,” says Mary Beth Johnson, CRI, a professor of court reporting at the Community College of Allegheny County.

“Our school is located in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. We live in an area where court reporters are very generous. Our students have been the beneficiaries of donated steno paper, machines, and thousands of dollars in scholarship monies. As a teacher, I am always appreciative of the largesse of court reporters,” she adds.

State court reporting associations also recognize the importance of donating old steno machines and other items to benefit students. Recently, both the California Court Reporters Association and the Wisconsin Court Reporters Association (WCRA) issued calls to their members to donate old machines to schools and to volunteers who are leading the A to Z Program, a free introductory course of basic steno for those who might be interested in pursuing a court reporting or captioning career.

“In Wisconsin, I know of several reporters who donated their steno machines to the court reporting schools and also to the A to Z Program,” says Sheri Piontek, RMR, CRR, CRC, an official from Green Bay and president of WCRA.

“The A to Z Program is what prompted Wisconsin to request donations of machines as a means of trying to increase the number of students in the court reporting profession. The only way this program is successful is by asking the reporters to donate their older models to the students,” she adds. To date, WCRA members have hosted two A to Z Programs within the state and have a third planned for the fall, Piontek notes.

Donating old machines to court reporting schools can also help offset tuition expenses for students. In some cases, donating a machine can be used as a tax deduction.

“When I decide to recycle or toss my steno machine, I give it to a court reporting student,” says Laura Lynn Murphy, RMR, a freelance court reporter from St. Louis, Mo.

“Many of them are renting a machine. I like to think that if they don’t have the rent to pay, they will be more inclined to join Missouri Court Reporting Association or, perhaps, NCRA as a student because they have to pay dues to join,” says Murphy.

“If there isn’t a need from a student, I donate the steno machine to Ranken Technical College. The students there are learning how machines work and when they tear down, hopefully, learn the machinations. I also give them old Dictaphones or digital equipment, anything that would help their training and not go into landfills,” she adds.

Murphy also suggests offering an old machine to companies that sells new ones in exchange for credit toward a new purchase. Many times, she notes, companies will use the old machines for repair parts.

Donating an old machine to a student is invaluable, according to Kelly Moranz, CRI, program manager and adjunct faculty at Cuyahoga Community College’s captioning and court reporting program in Cuyahoga, Ohio.

These machines are distributed to students in need, and it can sometimes mean a difference as to whether they can begin the program or not,” Moranz says.

“Professionals typically reach out to us if they have a machine to donate. Through the grants we have received in the past, we have machines for campus students that cycle through the program. We are able to supply online students with the same opportunity with the machines donated by professionals. Additionally, for students mentioning they have spoken to a professional, I encourage them to reach out and see if they have an extra machine available,” she adds.

Johnson notes that she and her staff are not at all shy about asking for donations of old machines and other items, especially since working professionals have been consistently very generous with the program.

“Donations are critical to the success of our program. Please know how grateful we are for decades of donations, not limited to machines, but also including guest speakers, mentors, and scholarship donors. In Pittsburgh, professional reporters donate their time, talent, and treasure consistently,” she says.

TechLinks: Protect yourself from ransomware

TechLinks_logoThe NCRA Technology Committee has gathered a few resources on the new WannaCry ransomware attack.

Robin Nodland, FAPR, RDR, CRR, shared an article from Gizmodo that provides basic information on the ransomware attack, including where and how it started. The article will be updated with new developments.

Nodland also shared tips for keeping yourself safe, written by the IT personnel for LNS Court Reporting & Captioning, Portland, Ore.

Lisa Knight, FAPR, RDR, CRR, shared a TechConnect article on patches that Microsoft has published for Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, and Windows 8.

Finally, Nodland shared PCMag‘s best ransomware protection of 2017.

DEITZ Court Reporting launches updated website

JCR logoIn a press release issued May 9, DEITZ Court Reporting, New York, N.Y., announced it has launched an updated website to better serve clients.

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