UPDATE: Parliamentary review of voting tally results in additional changes to Bylaws

NCRA members voted on 12 amendments to the Constitution & Bylaws following the Annual Business Meeting on Aug. 2, 2018, which occurred in conjunction with the NCRA Convention & Expo in New Orleans, La.  A question arose on the NCRA state leaders listserve on how abstention votes were counted in accordance with Roberts Rules of Order Newly Revised Edition, so a parliamentary review was requested.  Upon parliamentary confirmation of the rule/method for counting abstention votes, all amendments except Amendment 11, the name change, are now deemed to have passed.  Going forward, NCRA has put in place a policy to have voting results verified by our parliamentarian before being announced to our membership.

Per our Constitution & Bylaws, Article IX, Section 5b, “The latest edition of Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised shall be the official parliamentary guide for all business sessions when they are not in conflict with this Constitution and Bylaws or rules adopted by the Association during the annual business meeting or by the Board of Directors.”  Robert’s Rules of Order Newly Revised, Page 415, “ignore blank ballots and other ballots that indicate no preference, treating them as abstentions” and “all ballots that indicate a preference – provided they have been cast by persons entitled to vote – are taken into account in determining the number of votes cast for purposes of computing.”

To pass, Bylaws amendments must receive at least two-thirds (66.7%) affirmation by the Voting Members who are voting by electronic mail or other authorized means of electronic transmission. The numbers below reflect the percentages voting for each amendment:

NumberNamePass/FailedPercentage Voted For
1Voting for Officers and Board of DirectorsPassed (previously reported as failed)71.9%
2Voting on Bylaws AmendmentsPassed82.0%
3Clarification of electoral processPassed83.6%
4Elections when more than two candidates are running for the same positionPassed81.5%
5Number of Directors on the BoardPassed (previously reported as failed)71.4%
6Clarification of the timing of terms of officePassed84.8%
7Elimination of requirement to include a consumer or public member as part of the Council of the Academy of Court Reporters (CAPR)Passed (previously reported as failed)72.9%
8Clarification of electronic mail votingPassed83.5%
9Removal of reference of electronic voting in a business meetingPassed (previously reported as failed)71.4%
10Definition of Voting MembersPassed84.7%
11Name changeFailed47.3%
12Meeting referencePassed92.3%

During the Annual Business Meeting, Keith Lemons and Yolanda Walton were elected by majority vote to fill unoccupied spaces on the Board of Directors resulting from the promotion of two Directors to Officer positions on the Board.

The Constitution & Bylaws permits all eligible NCRA voting members to vote through electronic means on Bylaws amendments and contested Board of Directors elections. The Bylaws amendments ranged from minor, including cleaning up some repetitive language, to more substantial, such as streamlining the voting procedures for amendments and elections. Eligible voting members participated through a private, secure link during the 12-hour voting period. View all voting results.

Marjorie A. Peters Recognized with 2018 Santo J. Aurelio Award for Altruism

Nancy Hopp and Marjorie Peters

NCRA member Marjorie A. Peters, RMR, CRR, a freelance court reporter and firm owner from Pittsburgh, Pa., was honored with the 2018 Santo J. Aurelio Award for Altruism. The award was presented by NCRF during NCRA’s Convention & Expo held Aug. 2-5 in New Orleans, La.

The Aurelio Award is given to a working court reporter with more than 25 years of experience who has given back to the profession and to the court reporting community with no expectation of any reward.

“Receiving the Santo Aurelio Award was an emotional and overwhelming moment, only made better because I was able to share it in person with so many friends and colleagues who offered their heartfelt congratulations and kind words.  When I see photos on Facebook, I continue to be deeply touched,” said Peters, who owns Marjorie Peters Court Reporting.

“When I look at past years’ awardees, I am in awe to be included now in their company and then even more humbled that my dear friends nominated me and saw it through,” she added.

At the national level, Peters has presented numerous times at NCRA’s annual Convention & Expo as well as has served on a number of the Association’s committees. She is a longtime supporter of NCRF.

Active at the state level, she has served twice on the Pennsylvania Court Reporters Association Board of Directors. She has served on the Board of Directors for the Society for the Technological Advancement of Reporting (STAR) and has coordinated a number of Veterans History Project events to capture the stories of U.S. war veterans for the Library of Congress to preserve.

She has sponsored students at both the state and national levels for memberships and convention fees and often invites students from the court reporting program at the Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) into her home office to demonstrate live captioning.

Active in her community, Peters is a longtime volunteer with the Light of Life Rescue Mission, as well as the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix Race, which benefits the Autism Society. She is also a lector at the Assumption Church in Bellevue, Pa.

“I feel Marjorie is the perfect example of the meaning of the word altruism – the belief in or practice of disinterested and selfless concern for the well-being of others,” said life-long friend Janis L. Ferguson, RPR, CRR, who was one of several of Peters’ peers to nominate her.

“She has demonstrated this time and time again through her concern for her family, her concern for her community, and her concern and passion for her chosen profession. It has been an honor to nominate her,” added Ferguson, a freelance court reporter from Erie, Pa.

“Marjorie’s work history is made up of every facet of our profession – judicial reporting, captioning, and freelance work. She does not hesitate to volunteer in every way she can manage for our school in western Pennsylvania, and is a great aid to CCAC,” wrote Donna Cascio, FAPR, RDR, CMRS, an official court reporter from Somerset, Pa., who also nominated Peters.

“She is a great ambassador for our profession — and for living with compassion and kindness on this planet,” Cascio added.

Peters said that each year, she continues to be inspired by court reporters, CART and broadcast captioners, and firm owners who offer themselves to build up the profession, as well as their communities, and offered the following words of encouragement: “Let us always be encouraged by each other. Always remember to allow yourself to be inspired, and that any act of kindness, no matter how small, is never wasted. Smile at a hard-working clerk. Act when action is needed. And give whenever you can. Your heart and mind will be most richly rewarded.”

NCRA contests draw attention to court reporting, captioning professions

Sherry Bryant and Mark Kislingbury

New Orleans media outlets interviewed several NCRA members who competed in the NCRA Speed Contest and NCRA Realtime Contest during the NCRA Convention & Expo held there earlier this month.

NCRA member and Guinness world record holder Mark Kislingbury, FAPR, RDR, CRR, from Houston, Texas, was featured in a segment on ABC affiliate WGNO that aired Aug. 8. The interview took place during NCRA’s 2018 Convention & Expo held in New Orleans Aug. 2-5, where Kislingbury won the National Realtime Contest.

Erminia Uviedo and Donna Karoscik

NCRA members Erminia Uviedo, RDR, CRR, CRC, and Donna Karoscik, RDR, CRR, CRC, were interviewed by New Orleans station WWLTV Channel 4 about the court reporting and captioning professions and what it’s like to compete in the National Realtime Contest.

Keynote Speaker: You have to create and lead change

Keynote Speaker Lt. Gen. Russel Honoré (U.S. Army, Ret.)

With the mantra, “Don’t be stuck on stupid,” NCRA 2018 Convention & Expo keynote speaker Lt. Gen. Russel L. Honoré (U.S. Army, Ret.), a 37-year veteran of active service, used his natural humor to share his insights about what leadership is, when and how to use it, and why we need to be resilient.

Honoré, who served as the commander of Joint Task Force Katrina, during which time he became known as the “Category 5 General” for his striking leadership style in coordinating military relief efforts in post-hurricane New Orleans, also shared his military story during a special Veterans History Project interview held during the premier session.

Honoré shared with the audience that the ballroom they were sitting in served as the temporary home to the battalion under his command during Hurricane Katrina, as it was one of the only dry places available after the horrific flooding. He said he and members of his team evacuated people from the nearby Superdome through the hotel and onto buses waiting outside.

“On any given day, anything man-made can be broken by Mother Nature,” Honoré said.

He also talked about his experiences in other hurricane recoveries, including Hurricane Maria that devastated Puerto Rico, the Florida Keys, and other coastal areas, and shared some of the lessons those experiences taught him, including the importance of being resilient rather than being stuck on stupid. He illustrated his point by sharing the story of a McDonald’s restaurant built on a river that has flooded numerous times and has been rebuilt numerous times. Each time it has flooded, some 20 employees are out of work.

Veterans History Project interview: Danielle Griffin, Mike Miller, Russel Honore

“We’ve got to stop being stupid. If you build along a river, you’re gonna flood. With the various changes in weather, if you live along the coast, you need to be ready for storms. Sea levels have risen along the East Coast and our coastlines are at risk. You need leadership to help raise good kids because they are the ones who will need to lead us through the strains and challenges of the changing weather and other issues of today,” Honoré said.

The points Honoré shared with the audience about leadership included:

  • Grow children. You are going to have to practice leadership. Save your best leadership for when you get home. Leading at work is easy. Leadership is the ability to influence others to accomplish a task or a challenge. Ask, what does it take to influence this child?
  • You want to surround yourself with smart people.
  • Leadership comes at a price. You need to figure out what works. To lead requires sacrifice. If you are not sacrificing, you are not leading.
  • Do the routine things well. Teach your children that.
  • Don’t be afraid of the impossible.
  • Don’t be afraid of the opportunities on the other side of the impossible. Be resilient. Go figure out how to deal with things. We put a man on the moon but haven’t been able to develop a transmitter that a squirrel can’t chew through.

“If you are going to lead, you are going to be criticized,” Honoré told the audience. “People are scared of change. You have to create and lead change. People push back on change. Be patient when leading. The change you need to create won’t be easy. If it is easy, you haven’t changed enough.”

PAC basket raffle raises awareness and funds

The Gift Basket Extravaganza sponsored by NCRA’s Government Relations Department to benefit the Association’s PAC (Political Action Committee) raised $1,905. Eleven states and NCRA participated in the fundraising event held at the Association’s 2018 Convention & Expo that took place in New Orleans Aug. 2-5.

Among the states that packed baskets full of items representative of their states were Arizona, California, the California Official Court Reporters Association (COCRA), Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Kansas, Michigan, Mississippi, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. Items ranged from bottles of wine, cheeses, various snacks, baked goods, fiesta ware, beach items, and more. NCRA’s basket featured Washington, D.C. memorabilia.

Shaunise Day and Mike Miller

The winning basket was donated by NCRA student member Shaunise Day on behalf of the COCRA, and featured an array of California-related items including some top-notch champagne. Day won a registration to the 2019 NCRA Legislative Boot Camp for her most popular basket. NCRA member Michael Miller, FAPR, RDR, CRR, a freelance court reporter from Houston, Texas, won the COCRA basket.

“This fundraiser was very successful in raising money for an important cause, and in getting members excited about the PAC and what it does,” said Matthew R. Barusch, NCRA’s Manager of State Government Relations.

“The states that contributed to the fundraiser really stepped up with some incredible donations, and showed off real state pride in each and every basket. Thank you to every state who contributed to this new fundraiser, and to the PAC Governing Board for planning a big hit at the convention, this would not have been a success without you. I see this fundraiser being even bigger and better next year, and hope that even more states will take the opportunity to show off their states in Denver!”

NCRA member Mark Kislingbury shows off his fast fingers on local New Orleans News with a Twist

WGNO news reporter Kenny Lopez with NCRA member Mark Kislingbury

NCRA member and Guinness world record holder Mark Kislingbury, FAPR, RDR, CRR, from Houston, Texas, was featured in a segment on ABC affiliate WGNO that aired Aug. 8. The interview took place during NCRA’s 2018 Convention & Expo held in New Orleans Aug. 2-5, where Kislingbury also won the National Realtime Contest.

Watch here.

Immediate Past President’s final address to the membership at 2018 Convention & Expo

Chris Willette

The following is the speech given by Immediate Past President Christine J. Willette, RDR, CRR, CRC, Wausau, Wis., during the Aug. 2 Annual Business Meeting at the 2018 Convention & Expo in New Orleans, La.

Five minutes is not nearly enough for me to tell you about the accomplishments of NCRA’s volunteers, Board of Directors, CEO, and staff. I will do my best! My apologies in advance to Andrea Couch, our captioner today. I know she will forgive me. Besides, she’s got amazing skills.

Shortly after the last time I stood in front of our membership, the room went dark. I knew then that it was going to be a fantastic year since we had just received a fresh jolt of electricity!

As many of you know, leadership has its ups and downs. I am a firm believer that there are no mistakes in life … only lessons. Challenges present opportunities. By choice, I apply lessons learned and move forward in a positive and constructive manner.

Allow me to share just a few of our accomplishments over the past 12 months.

Immediately following convention, the board set out to vet and hire our new CEO. More than 100 candidates applied. The Board sought a leader with the skill set to get our finances under control and lead our association through a needed transition to position NCRA for a successful future. Marcia Ferranto became a full-time employee of NCRA in October. Marcia brings extensive experience, analytical and fact-based decision-making ability, and a keen focus on success. She possesses an energetic, positive attitude, filled with passion for what she loves to do: manage associations.

Next, on the Board’s agenda — a new Strategic Plan. Vision 2018 was upon us, and we needed a new plan to define who we are, where we are going, how we will get there, and what success looks like. The Board, together with Marcia and staff, debated, brainstormed, and deliberated for countless hours, and we approved the final Plan in May. The SP has three key priorities with specific deliverables and accountability.

The Annual Firm Owners conference — the largest attendance ever — featured an influx of fresh content and networking opportunities.

NCRA’s Legislative Boot Camp was completely revamped. Due to the continued philanthropic work of our Foundation — NCRF — it was a highlight of my year and with great humility that I conducted a Veterans History Project interview of Purple Heart Recipient and United States Marine Veteran Rob Jones at the United States Library of Congress. Google him!

Both the CRC and the CLVS certification processes were updated and brought online for easier member access. A CRC certification fast track was approved for experienced professionals in the captioning field, and a guidebook was also created. Most recently, the Board has approved offering an advanced captioning certification.

The process for schools wishing to gain NCRA approval has been improved and expanded to allow more schools to become NCRA-approved. Speaking of schools, the NCRA A to Z program is doing a fantastic job of getting students into those schools. Thank you to the hundreds of volunteers who have given their time to facilitate A to Z classes. We have also created an online course so that anyone anywhere who is interested in learning about the magic of our stenographic skill can do so.

As I said in last year’s address, the financial position of NCRA was of great concern and a matter on which I intended to focus. With Marcia’s expertise, and in conjunction with the finance committee and our CFO, the Board has adopted a new approach to assessing and monitoring our finances. I am quite confident in the new measures in place. In fact, as reflected in our second quarter financials, we are currently tracking on budget for the first time in years.

National Captioners and Reporters Association — NCRA — the proposed name change is the result of in‐depth strategic plan dialogue and the Member Needs Assessment. The new name supports our goals of attracting people to the captioning and court reporting professions and creating a greater awareness of who we are and the beneficial services our members provide. It better reflects the current and future status of the profession. The new name gives better recognition to a growing segment of the Association’s membership: captioners.

Including a tagline to our logo — “Steno: The standard in capturing the spoken word” — maintains our focus on representing the professionals who use a stenographic machine to earn a living.

Change is rarely easy but often necessary. The transition to reality of the current state of our profession requires perseverance and confidence that the future can be better if we apply what we’ve learned and move forward.

The NCRA Board of Directors consists of 14 passionate individuals. My thanks for your dedication. Together with NCRA staff, we create a dynamic and diversified team of subject matter experts. I ask membership to have confidence and understand that we are all in this together. We all seek success and a bright future.

It is hard to believe that a year has gone by. Some days seemed to last forever, while others were gone in the blink of an eye.

I want to express my gratitude to those who have provided encouragement and inspiration. You know who you are! The messages, hugs, and thoughtful gifts brought a smile to my heart and motivated me to persevere. My life has been enriched by the interactions I have had with members, board colleagues, and staff.

I thank God for the ability to work hard, the compassion and drive to give back in service to others, and the perseverance and patience to guide me. I feel blessed to have had the opportunity to serve my profession at this level. I am confident that I have contributed to the advancement of our association, and I am proud of our accomplishments. Indeed, it has required hard work, service, and perseverance. Thank you for the honor.

President’s address to the membership at the 2018 NCRA Convention & Expo

Sue Terry

The following is the speech given by 2018-2019 NCRA President Sue A. Terry, FAPR, RPR, CRR, CRC, at the 2018 Convention & Expo in New Orleans, La., during the Aug. 3 Premier Session.

Good morning. First, I want to thank each of you for your presence here this morning to kick off the year for our association.

I’d also like to thank and recognize my family for being here with me this morning and for the years of endless support you’ve given me, and a very heartfelt thank-you to my husband of 49 years, Keith, who has been my rock since the age of 13. I’d also like to thank my many friends who have supported me, guided me and placed your faith in me. And last, but certainly not least, thank you to each of our board members who came to the table and shared your passion and wisdom in each of the decisions we were tasked with making this year, and there were many.

How can I begin to tell you all the things that need to be said in such a short time this morning about us and I do mean us! We are all NCRA.

While trying to come up with just the right words to inspire you, I found myself at the Google search bar looking for that inspiration, even resorting to random, silly searches like www.greatinspirationforsueterry.com.

I’m sure that every president of this association before me has stepped into their board experience with a vision of how their leadership is going to make a difference, how they are going to improve the profession and better the organization. I know in my heart that is true, and I thank every, single past president of this organization who has stepped up to serve and given freely of their personal time. Thank you. Would every person who has ever served on a state or national committee, board, or task force, please rise. All of you are our true unsung heroes.

I’d like to briefly share with you a bit of my background and passion for reporting. My career began like many of yours. I graduated from a local, small-town court reporting program. The program I attended was self-pay, so I had to write a check monthly. I struggled to make those $65-a-month payments and wondered each time I wrote the check if I could hang in there just one more month. I’m so thankful I did stick with it, because it was a life-changer. My final total investment in a phenomenal career was $845, plus the cost of my first new steno machine, a “manual” blue Hedman Stenoprint at a cost of $135, which I paid $90 down and the remaining balance spread over three months. It included a dust cover and two-year warranty. My, how times have changed!

Students here today, listen up. That initial investment has afforded me the opportunity to meet and work with people in every walk of life, from gang members to factory workers, from environmental specialists to the top physicians and surgeons in the world. I’ve been able to be the ears of hard-of-hearing professionals by providing realtime translation for them to enable them to “hear” their meetings and conferences. My $845 investment also afforded me the opportunity to serve as a realtime reporter producing transcripts for President Obama and Vice President Biden at Camp David. How incredible is a career in court reporting!

Each of us can tell our own inspiring stories, and we all have similar experiences we can share. We must begin to look for opportunities everywhere to tell our stories. Your story may just be the one that motivates someone to join our ranks or inspires a student to pass that next speed hurdle.

That’s what I’m going to ask you to help the NCRA board with today, shaping our future, writing our stories. I can’t do it alone, and neither can this board. We need your help.

There are challenges we face as an industry, and I’d like to discuss at least a couple of them this morning.

  1. Shortage of new students into our profession. While NCRA has undertaken some innovative solutions to address this problem, such as disseminating information on our Discover Steno website, providing brochures, aptitude tests and other tools to aid our schools, what we can’t do is be the eyes and ears in your community. We’d ask you to go to the Discover web site and review the materials, then go into your communities and host informational events to promote our A-to-Z initiative. It’s going to take a hefty grass roots effort to increase our numbers. I know many of you have gone into high schools, church youth groups. The National Honor Society has estimated there are over one million students participating in their organization. Think of it; one million of the nation’s brightest students. Will you consider sponsoring a small reception at their induction ceremonies to celebrate and mingle with them, their parents and their teachers? You can offer to caption their induction ceremony speeches so they can actually then experience firsthand the vital services we perform. This would give us access to students who have already demonstrated both an academic GPA of 3.5 or above, and also the character of the four pillars of the National Honor Society; scholarship, service, leadership and character. It would give us access to exactly the kind of student we are looking to recruit and gain wider awareness of our profession.
  2. NCRA governance. We are an organization ripe for culture change. We must begin to think differently and find ways to build upon our strengths and improve upon our weaknesses. I believe we can greatly improve NCRA governance, and I will be working hard to do that this year.
  3. My first order of business as NCRA President was to work with Max, our President-Elect, and Marcia Ferranto NCRA’s new Executive Director and CEO, to restructure NCSA into what we hope to be the Congress of Court Reporting. We believe the states and their leaders are the cornerstone of NCRA. I, along with our Board, believe in our members, and that together, we can create a stronger NCRA. New regional directors have been selected, and we will be asking them to work with us to craft a new framework for NCSA, designed by you, our states, that will add much additional input to the NCRA board to guide us in our decisions so that we are cognizant of your concerns and desires when deliberating. This new NCSA will have a much stronger voice in the affairs of your
  4. Exploring new markets for our services. There are many new and unexplored opportunities in the captioning industry, and it promises great growth. I will work with Marcia Ferranto and our board to explore some of those opportunities in some new markets this year. I read one survey recently of businesses who estimated their captioning needs for video would grow by 74% in the coming year. There are 300 hours of video uploaded to YouTube every minute. Almost five billion videos are watched on Youtube every, single day. Let’s be sure we are at the forefront of these video captioning opportunities.
  5. Protecting our officialships. We must remain vigilant and aggressive in providing education and building relationships that assists us in keeping steno as the preferred method of capturing the record so that we can protect the rights of all litigants who pass through the courtroom doors.
  6. Provide strong support for our freelance community by providing educational seminars and resources to enhance their businesses, as well as encouraging and promoting better communications between our freelancers and the firms they serve.

In closing tonight, I would say that this board has navigated some very rough waters this year. However, I’ve learned that in life, the things that go wrong are often the very things that lead to change and bring greater successes that couldn’t even have been imagined without the newfound wisdom those experiences teach us. This year, I plan to listen a lot. There’s going to be immense talent around me, and I plan to spend a lot of time listening as this board arrives at the very best decisions they can make for you. I plan to listen to you, our members, for without you, we cease to exist.

I would ask you to spend the remainder of our convention celebrating one another, not as captioners or freelancers or firm owners or videographers, but as professionals, united in our purpose and supporting our association. Thank you.

Kislingbury and Bryant step in the winners’ circle again

2018 Speed and Realtime contestants

Sherry Bryant, RMR, CRR, and Mark Kislingbury, RDR, CRC, repeated wins for the national NCRA Speed Contest and Realtime Contest, respectively.

Bryant, who previously won in 2012, placed first in the Literary leg, with 5 errors; second in the Legal Opinion, with 12; and second in the Testimony, with 62. Her combined overall score was 97.94 percent. Bryant lives in Harrisburg, Pa. Patricia Nilsen, RMR, CRR, CRC, CRI, of Nashville, Tenn., came in second place overall, and Karen Tyler, RDR, CRR, CRC, of Shreveport, La., placed third.

Kislingbury, who lives in Houston, Texas, earned first place overall in the Realtime Contest. It is his fifth Realtime Contest win. This win ties the record for most wins in the NCRA Realtime Contest with current Contests Committee co-chair Jo Ann Bryce, RMR, CRR, of Castro Valley, Calif. Kislingbury’s overall score was 99.245 percent.

Doug Zweizig, RDR, CRR, of Baltimore, Md., took second place overall with a score of 98.933 percent. In addition to her Speed championship, Bryant earned third place overall in the Realtime Contest. Kislingbury, Zweizig, and past champion Dee Boenau, RDR, CRR, CRC, of Sarasota, Fla., tied for first in the Literary leg.

Kislingbury was interviewed by a local news station following the Realtime Contest. Realtime contestants Erminia Uviedo, RDR, CRR, CRC, and Donna Karoscik, RDR, CRR, CRC, were also interviewed by a morning TV show in New Orleans.

The Speed Contest consists of three legs: literary at 220 wpm, legal opinion at 230 wpm, and testimony at 280 wpm. Contestants have a total of 90 minutes per leg for transcription. The Realtime Contest consists of two legs: literary at 200 wpm and testimony at 225 wpm. Contestants must turn in an ASCII file immediately following the end of dictation. In both contests, contestants must receive 95 percent accuracy to qualify; accuracy also determines the winners.

2018 Speed Contest Results

OVERALL COMBINED SCORES

Place   Percentage
1 Sherry Bryant, RMR, CRR 97.94%
2 Patricia Nilsen, RMR, CRR, CRC, CRI 97.18%
3 Karen Tyler, RDR, CRR, CRC 97.10%

 

LITERARY

Place   Errors Percentage
1 Sherry Bryant 5 99.545%
2 Traci Mertens, RDR, CRR, CRC 6 99.455%
3 Dee Boenau, RMR, CRR, CRC 12 98.909%
4 Julianne LaBadia, RDR, CRR, CRC 14 98.727%
5 Patricia Nilsen 17 98.455%
6 John Wissenbach, RDR, CRR, CRC 20 98.182%
7 Kathy Cortopassi, RMR, CRR, CRC 24 97.818%
8 Karen Tyler 26 97.636%
9 Allison Hall, RMR, CRR 31 97.182%
10 Donna Urlaub, RMR, CRR 34 96.909%
11 Ronald Cook, RDR, CRR, CRC 36 96.727%
11 Kathryn Thomas, RDR, CRR, CRC 36 96.727%
12 Melanie Humphrey-Sonntag, RDR, CRR, CRC 39 96.455%
13 Chase Frazier, RMR, CRR, CRC 46 95.818%
13 Rich Germosen, RMR, CRR 46 95.818%
14 Sabrina Lewis, RDR, CRR 53 95.182%
15 Darlene Fuller, RMR, CRR 54 95.091%
15 Sheri Smargon, RDR, CRR, CRC 54 95.091%

 

LEGAL OPINION

Place   Errors Percentage
1 Julianne LaBadia 12 98.957%
2 Sherry Bryant 14 98.783%
3 John Wissenbach 18 98.435%
4 Karen Tyler 22 98.087%
4 Doug Zweizig, RDR, CRR 22 98.087%
5 Patricia Nilsen 28 97.565%
6 Dee Boenau 30 97.391%
7 Traci Mertens 35 96.957%
8 Donna Urlaub 43 96.261%
9 Kathy Cortopassi 55 95.217%

 

Q&A

Place   Errors Percentage
1 Karen Tyler 62 95.571%
2 Sherry Bryant 63 95.500%
2 Patricia Nilsen 63 95.500%
3 Rich Germosen 66 95.286%

* Contest results are preliminary.