INTERSTENO: Registration for Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 22

Intersteno’s 2018 Internet Keyboarding Competition being held April 23 through May 9 via its website allows steno machine writers and other keyboarders to test their skills and find out how they rate worldwide. Registration for Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 22. NCRA members who place in the contest will be listed in upcoming issues of the JCR and JCR Weekly.

“Please participate. It’s fun and only 10 minutes of your time,” said Tori Pittman, FAPR, RDR CRI, a longtime participant of the contest and chair of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force. “You can write in steno or just type on a 101-key standard keyboard.”

Pittman is a 2017 Intersteno Bronze Medalist in the category of overall Speech Capture and a three-time Intersteno Gold Medalist in the category of voice Speech Capture. She is a freelance court reporter and agency owner from Wake Forest, N.C.

Competitors will use the Taki software, which is a free download on the Intersteno website, and can participate on a day of their own choosing between April 23 and May 9. It’s up to the individual to decide how they want to enter the competition.

Court reporting programs can register groups of students and host a competition for a class or entire school in conjunction with the event. Court reporting students who are interested in participating should contact their instructor about registering.

For more information about the competition or to register as an individual contestant, contact NCRA at intersteno@ncra.org.

More information on the contest is available at Intersteno.org.

Interested in the Intersteno Internet Contest? Check out these stories:

Get a taste of international competition without leaving your office

NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force interviews the winners of the Intersteno Internet Keyboarding Contest

 

INTERSTENO: Internet keyboarding competition showcases ability around the world

Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition, held April 23 through May 9 via its website, allows steno machine writers and other keyboarders to test their skills and find out how they rate worldwide. Registration for Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition is open from March 19 through April 22. NCRA members who place in the contest will be listed in upcoming issues of the JCR and JCR Weekly.

Competitors will use the Taki software, which is a free download on the Intersteno website, and can participate on a day of their own choosing between April 23 and May 9. It’s up to the individual to decide how they want to enter the contest — whether using a steno machine or a regular keyboard.

Court reporting programs can register groups of students and host a competition for a class or entire school in conjunction with the event. Court reporting students who are interested in participating should contact their instructors about registering.

To enter, competitors should provide the following information:

  1. full name and address
  2. year of birth
  3. technology to be used (keyboard, stenotype machine)
  4. language: choose mother-tongue or multilingual
  5. the date they plan to take the test

Send the above information to intersteno@ncra.org. The cost of the contest in U.S. dollars is:

■ $6 for participation only in the mother tongue
■ $8 for competitors writing in two or more languages

Checks must be received by NCRA no later than April 22. Participants will be registered once the check is received. Checks should be made payable to NCRA and mailed to:

NCRA
Attention: Internet Competition
12030 Sunrise Valley Dr., Suite 400
Reston, VA 20191

More information on the contest is available at intersteno.org/intersteno-internet-contests.

Kislingbury tops list of Intersteno internet keyboarding contest

Intersteno logo -- a globe spinning on a pencil as an axisMark Kislingbury, FAPR, RDR, CRR, of Houston, Texas, placed first in Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition, held April 17 through May 9 via its website, in the single language category. Kislingbury recorded a total of 9,200 strokes with only 15 errors total. The second-place winner made 7,357 strokes.

The keyboarding competition consists of writing by machine or typing by keyboard as many words as possible of a selection provided visually on the screen. As part of the format of the contest, the text is automatically entered into an online computer program, which matches the original text against what the competitor entered for scoring.

In the Seniors section, Tori Pittman, FAPR, RDR, CRI, of Wake Forest, N.C., placed 72, and Donna Linton, RMR, of Ashburn, Va., placed 84, The Seniors section includes any competitor over the age of 21. Pitman is also chair of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force.

INTERSTENO: Registration for Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 16

Last chance to register for Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition and find out how your keyboarding skills rate around the world

Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition, held April 17 through May 9 via its website, allows steno machine writers and other keyboarders to test their skills and find out how they rate worldwide. Registration for Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 16. NCRA members who place in the contest will be listed in upcoming issues of the JCR and JCR Weekly.

“I really enjoyed competing in the Intersteno Internet contest,” says Mark Kislingbury, RDR, CRR, who participated for the first time in 2016. Kislingbury is a past NCRA Speed and Realtime Contest winner. “It was a completely new experience, learning to write realtime while reading from text (as opposed to hearing it dictated). It’s very challenging and certainly takes practice. The practice section of the website was very good, so I could practice a lot until I decided to take my test when I felt ready.”

“The Internet Competition will whet your appetite to participate in Intersteno,” says Tori Pittman, RDR, CRI, Chair of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force.

Competitors will use the Taki software, which is a free download on the Intersteno website, and can participate on a day of their own choosing between April 1 and May 9. It’s up to the individual to decide how they want to enter the contest — whether using a steno machine or a regular keyboard.

“It was really nice seeing so many competitors around the world using mostly a computer keyboard and how amazingly fast they were,” said Kislingbury. “I hope to compete again this year and significantly increase my characters per minute.”

Court reporting programs can register groups of student and host a competition for a class or entire school in conjunction with the event. Court reporting students who are interested in participating should contact their instructor about registering.

To enter, competitors should provide the following information: 1) full name and address; 2) year of birth; 3) technology to be used (keyboard, stenotype machine); 4) language: choose mother-tongue or multilingual; and 5) the date they plan to take the test to intersteno@ncra.org. The cost of the contest in U.S. dollars is:

  • $6 for participation only in the mother tongue
  • $8 for competitors writing in two or more languages

Checks must be received by NCRA no later than April 14. Participants will be registered once the check is received. Checks should be made payable to NCRA and mailed to:

NCRA
Attention: Internet Competition
12030 Sunrise Valley Dr., Suite 400
Reston, VA 20191

More information on the contest is available at intersteno.org/intersteno-internet-contests/.

 

Interested in the Intersteno Internet Contest? Check out these stories:

Get a taste of international competition without leaving your office

NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force interviews the winners of the Intersteno Internet Keyboarding Contest

INTERSTENO: Top of the world

Register for Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition to see how your keyboarding skills compare around the world

Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition, held April 17 through May 9 via its website, allows steno machine writers and other keyboarders to test their skills and find out how they rank worldwide. Registration for Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition is open from March 19-April 16.

“The Internet Competition will whet your appetite to participate in Intersteno,” says Tori Pittman, RDR, CRI, Chair of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force. “As a first step, you can take 10 minutes of your time and either type or steno stroke your way into international waters. Before your actual assigned time, a visit to the Intersteno practice site is important so you can be sure how it will work with your computer and keyboard/steno machine. Then it’s ready, set, go!”

Competitors will be using the Taki software, which is a free download from the Intersteno website, and can participate on a day of their own choosing between April 17 and May 9. It’s up to the individual to decide how they want to enter the contest — whether using a steno machine or a regular keyboard.

Court reporting programs can register groups of student and host a competition for a class or entire school in conjunction with the event. Court reporting students who are interested in participating should contact their instructor about registering.

“After you’ve done the Internet Competition and gotten your feedback, you will be inspired to research the Congress coming up this summer,” says Pittman. “Many opportunities for competition, education, and exploration await. All it takes is that first step and you’ll be hooked!”

To enter the Internet keyboarding contest, competitors should provide the following information: 1) full name and address; 2) year of birth; 3) technology to be used (keyboard, stenotype machine); 4) language: mother-tongue or multilingual; and 5) the date they plan to take the test to intersteno@ncra.org. The cost of the contest in U.S. dollars is:

  • $6 for participation only in the mother tongue
  • $8 for competitors writing in two or more languages

Checks must be received by NCRA no later than April 14. Participants will be registered once the check is received. Checks should be made payable to NCRA and mailed to:

NCRA
Attention: Internet Competition
12030 Sunrise Valley Dr., Suite 400
Reston, VA 20191

More information on the contest is available at intersteno.org/intersteno-internet-contests/.

Want more information about the Intersteno Internet Contest? Check out these stories:

Get a taste of international competition without leaving your office

NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force interviews the winners of the Intersteno Internet Keyboarding Contest

Registration for Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 16

 

INTERSTENO: Get a taste of international competition without leaving your office

By Kelly Linkowski

Intersteno’s 15th edition of the International Keyboarding Championship by Internet will take place April 17 through May 9. Each year, the numbers of international participants has increased, starting with 262 competitors 15 years ago to more than 1,700 last year. The Internet contest is a great way to test your own skills and may whet your appetite to travel to Berlin for the 51st Intersteno Congress, July 22-28.

NCRA will publish more news on how to register for the Intersteno competition in an upcoming JCR WeeklyRegistration for Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 16, so sign up soon.

Competitors can use a variety of methods for inputting straight copy during the contest. I use my steno machine (aka Jamie) with the keyboard macro in Eclipse to compete. Intersteno provides a Taki download on your computer that displays text, so I was typing what I read. Take time before the test to familiarize yourselves with the competition system at intersteno.org/intersteno-internet-contests/training-with-taki-version/. Only one shot per language is allowed, so work out any bugs beforehand! For my fellow American writers, the English text does not include double spaces after full stops; this is considered an error, and believe me, they can add up!

Reporters are commonly life-long learners; we expect the best of ourselves and we consistently improve our skills no matter how many years we’ve been at our machines. Even when competitors miss only one word in a dictation, you won’t hear “that was near perfect” but “next time, I’ll write it this way.”

As you seek to be the best writer you can be, you won’t be disappointed in the Internet competition. I look forward to competing with you in April!

Kelly Linkowski, RPR, CRR, CRC, CPE, is a broadcast captioner based in Rittman, Ohio. She can be reached at klinkowski@neo.rr.com. Linkowski is a member of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force and a past participant in Intersteno’s Internet Contests.

Learn more about the contests.

Registration for Internet Keyboarding Competition closes April 16

NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force interviews the winners of the Intersteno Internet Keyboarding Contest

Image from Intersteno

The top three Americans to place in the English as a mother tongue group of the Intersteno Internet Keyboarding Contest, which was held April 11 to May 2, were Sean Wrona, who placed first; Mark Kislingbury, who placed third; and Jelani Nelson, who placed fourth. Wrona’s total word count was 8237 with only seven errors. Kislingbury finished with a total of 8196 words with 20 errors.  Nelson ended with 7156 words and seven errors. NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force reached out to ask these three individuals questions about their participation and training.

Cela Askin of Turkey placed second in this category.

 

Sean Wrona, a captioning assistant from Syracuse, N.Y.

How did you develop your skills at typing/steno?

I taught myself to touch-type when I was about three years old on the old DOS program CPT Personal Touch-Typing. I attained a high speed of 83 wpm (415 cpm) at age six and 108 wpm (540 cpm) at age 10, which was faster than any of the other students or teachers at my elementary school.

What attracted you to competing at this level?

I always knew I could type quickly, but I discovered competitive typing by accident in the spring of 2008 while in grad school. My high school classmate was using the Facebook Typing Speed application, and it appeared in one of his status updates. I did a few 30-second races most days for the next few months and was rather startled to discover that I was consistently 20 wpm (100 cpm) faster than almost all the other users, with the primary exception of Jelani Nelson. Eventually, over the next year and a half, I started receiving private messages from people in the established competitive typing community inviting me to other sites.

Is this something that you do for fun, or is it useful in your work?

There are few jobs in the United States for which typing is the most important aspect to the job. Almost all typing jobs in the United States would rather you have great phone skills and mediocre typing skills than the other way around. While there are some data-entry jobs that just involve typing, they are fading fast and usually do not pay well. It can be useful in my recreational projects, but it isn’t very useful in most jobs here, as almost always other aspects of the job will be more important. It can help you to write quickly enough so you can keep up with your thoughts and not lose your train of thought when you are writing something, but that’s about it.

How did you hear about the Intersteno Internet Competition? How many years have you competed in this competition?

The Intersteno contest was frequently discussed on the forums of the competitive typing website Typing Zone, particularly by earlier champion Yifei “Dan” Chen, who I largely credit with introducing me to the game. He also helped me set up the Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator so that I could more easily type the accented characters that are not used in English.

What made you decide to participate?

While I was underemployed/unemployed for much of 2009 and 2010, I had a lot of time on my hands, so when I discovered how unusual my typing talent was, I began visiting pretty much all the competitive typing websites I could find and setting records on most of them, although I am much less obsessed today.

What keyboard did you use?

In most years I used a Das Keyboard after winning one in the Ultimate Typing Championship. However, the Das wore out somewhat this year, and I bought a cheaper Logitech this particular year, but almost all other years, I used a Das.

Did you notice anything that was specifically challenging during the testing time?

I have done so many typing tests at this point that they have become second nature, and endurance typing suits me because I lose a lot less speed than most other typists as the length of a text increases. I find typing over very short intervals in an attempt to set peak speed records to be much more stressful than casually typing at a steady rate of speed over a ten-minute period as in Intersteno.

Were you happy with your result?

Yes.

 

Mark Kislingbury, RDR, CRR, a court reporter from Houston, Texas

How did you develop your skills at typing/steno?

I worked from the beginning of my career on building a strong, realtime-ready dictionary. For much of my career I have shortened my writing by inventing/adopting briefs for words and phrases. By competing in speed contests and world-record events, I have pushed my speed, continually trying to improve.

What attracted you to competing at this level?

I was invited by NCRA to compete in the Intersteno Internet competition, which I didn’t realize existed. It was a very good experience and applying this skill in a way I have never done before: trying to replicate written text exactly.

Is this something that you do for fun, or is it useful in your work?

For me it was for fun and personal growth.

What made you decide to participate?

It seemed fun and interesting to be put into competition with people who use regular computer keyboards. Seems that we could call this MKA, or mixed keyboard arts.

What keyboard did you use?

I used what Intersteno calls a chorded keyboard, which of course is the steno machine keyboard invented by Ward Stone Ireland.

Did you notice anything that was specifically challenging during the testing time?

The software I used to write into the Taki input app would sometimes put an extra space, which would cost errors that I could not prevent.

Were you happy with your result?

Very. I have no doubt that I can improve on my score significantly, with practice.

Any other comments?

Congrats to Sean Wrona for a truly stupendous first-place performance; he is truly the Wizard of Typing and untouched world champion of the computer keyboard. I thank NCRA for inviting me to compete; had they not done so, I would not have even heard about it.

 

Jelani Nelson, a computer science professor from Cambridge, Mass.

How did you develop your skills at typing?

I started learning piano at 7 and playing video games at 4. That helped finger speed. I then learned proper typing technique starting at age 12, using Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing.

What attracted you to competing at speed typing?

I first started getting into it via the website typera.tk (my username there is Minilek).

Is this something that you do for fun, or is it useful in your work?

I do have to type quite a bit at work (emails, writing up papers, etc.), so it does help with work.

How did you hear about the Intersteno Internet Competition?

From fellow typists at typingzone.com.

What made you decide to participate?

I enjoy competition, and I enjoy opportunities to hone my typing skill.

What keyboard did you use?

Das keyboard.

Did you notice anything that was specifically challenging during the testing time?

Nothing specific.

Were you happy with your result?

Yes.

Internet Keyboarding Competition sign-ups close April 10

Those interested in participating in Intersteno’s Internet Keyboarding Competition should sign up before April 10.

“You can do the online contest from the comfort of your own home, no passports or international travel required,” says Tori Pittman, RDR, CRI, chair of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force. “It’s a small and easy step to learning more about your global counterparts.”

Competitors will be using the Taki software, which is downloadable from the Intersteno website, and can participate on a day of their own choosing between April 11 and May 2. Pittman recommends doing some research before competing “Go to the site and do the practice sessions so you understand how the software works,” she suggests.

Court reporting students who are interested in participating should contact their instructor about registering.

Competitors need to provide 1) their full name and address; 2) year of birth; 3) technology to be used (keyboard, stenotype machine); 4) language: mother-tongue or multilingual; and 5) the date they plan to take the test to intersteno@ncra.org. The cost of the contest in U.S. dollars is:

  • $6 for participation only in the mother tongue
  • $8 for competitors writing in two or more languages

Checks must be received by NCRA no later than April 10. Participants will be registered once the check is received. Checks should be made payable to NCRA and mailed to:

NCRA

Attention: Internet Competition

12030 Sunrise Valley Dr., Suite 400

Reston, VA 20191

More information on the contest is available at intersteno.org/intersteno-internet-contests/.

Going global: The Internet Keyboarding Competition – Join Team USA!

By Tori Pittman

As you may have know, Intersteno offers a way to participate in their competition from the comfort of your own home. No trans-Atlantic flights and jet lag, no customs and duty free; just you and your keyboard, typing (or stenoing) your heart out for a few minutes.

It really is a very simple way to whet your appetite for Intersteno. You can compete solo or perhaps have your whole reporting office sign up to participate, maybe even your state association. You could do a family team, a church team, your scouting troop. See, the Internet Keyboarding Competition is for everyone who uses a keyboard.

As outlined in a previous article and on the Intersteno website, individuals or teams sign up and then have a window to compete. Compitors type on the Intersteno platform and then wait for the results. The Intersteno website offers a guide and some practice materials for competitors. And people who speak Spanish, French, or something else – there are many options – may compete in several languages in addition to their mother tongue. There is a range of dates on which to compete, so people can make it fit within their schedules. The fee is small (approximately 7 euros which, at the time of the writing of this article, was approximately $7.25).

Most excitingly, your results are tallied within your group, your country, and then the world, so you can look and see how you rate.

Of course, after you’ve tasted a little bit of what Intersteno is, I’m sure you’ll be ready to make plans for Intersteno Congress 51 that will be taking place in 2017 in Berlin.

Please consider being a part of Team USA for the Internet Keyboarding Competition and also at the Congress in 2017.

For more information, please visit the Intersteno websites at www.intersteno.org and www.intersteno2017.org.

Tori Pittman, RDR, CRI, a freelancer in Wake Forest, N.C., is chair of NCRA’s Intersteno Task Force. She can be reached at tori@tori-pittman.com.