NCRF accepting nominations for Frank Sarli Memorial and Student Intern scholarships

The National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF) is now accepting nominations for the Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship and the Student Intern Scholarship. The deadline for both these scholarships is Dec. 1.

Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship

NCRF’s Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship of $2,000 has benefited court reporting students nearing graduation for 20 years. The award honors the late Frank Sarli, a court reporter who was committed to supporting students at the highest level of their education. Sarli, who was studying to become a professional pianist, turned to court reporting when he could no longer afford the tuition to music school. During his career, he opened Accurate Court Reporters in Orlando, Fla., Orange County’s first independent court reporting firm, and was a founding member of the Florida Shorthand Reporters Association. Sarli also served in numerous roles at the national level, including as a director for NCRA. He was the first Floridian to earn NCRA’s Distinguished Service Award.

“This scholarship helped me immensely because I was able to use some of the funds for my professional machine, which helped me enter the workforce without being in debt, the first leg of my RPR, and my airfare to attend the NCRA Convention in Chicago, which was incredibly inspiring and motivating for a new reporter/recent grad,” said Nicole Bulldis, RPR, an official court reporter in Pasco, Wash., and the 2016 recipient of the Sarli scholarship.

Court reporting students must be nominated by an instructor or advisor and meet a number of specific criteria to be eligible, including:

  • enrollment in an NCRA-approved court reporting program
  • passing at least one of the court reporting program’s Q&A tests at a minimum of 200 words per minute
  • having a GPA of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale,
  • demonstrating the need for financial assistance
  • possessing the qualities exemplified by a professional court reporter, including attitude, demeanor, dress, and motivation

Submit a nomination for the Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship

Student Intern Scholarship

Each year, NCRF awards two $1,000 scholarships to students who have completed or are currently performing the required internship portion of their court reporting program. They must also meet other specific criteria, including:

  • current membership in NCRA
  • having a grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale
  • attending an NCRA-approved court reporting program

A generous annual donation from the Reis Family Foundation helps fund these scholarships.

“Receiving [this scholarship], was a financial boon for my transition from student intern to working reporter,” said Stephen Sudano, a freelance court reporter from Bohemia, N.Y., and one of the 2016 recipients of the Student Intern Scholarship. “A career as a freelance court reporter requires a substantial investment to get off the ground. This scholarship helped pay for my professional equipment, and I appreciate it to this day.”

Submit a nomination for the Student Intern Scholarship

NCRF’s scholarships and grant are supported by donations to the NCRF Angels Drive and other fundraisers. To learn more about these scholarships, and to find the nomination forms, please visit NCRA.org/NCRF/Scholarships.

NCRF announces 2016 student scholarship winners

The National Court Reporters Foundation has announced that Natasha Jones, a student from Hoffman Estates, Ill., who attends Prince Institute – Great Lakes, was named recipient of the 2016 Robert H. Clark Scholarship. The Foundation also announced the two recipients of the 2016 Student Intern Scholarships: Aspen Keech, a student from Pittsburgh, Pa., who attends the Community College of Allegheny County, and Stephen Sudano, a student from Bohemia, N.Y., who attends the Long Island Business Institute.

Annually through 2019, NCRF will randomly draw one recipient of the Robert H. Clark Scholarship from nominations that have been submitted to receive a $1,800 scholarship to support the remainder of his or her education. Students are nominated by instructors or other officials at their schools. To be eligible, nominees must be NCRA members, enrolled in an NCRA-certified court reporting program, have passed at least one of their program’s Q&A tests at 200 words per minute, and possess a GPA of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, among other criteria. Jones is the second recipient of this award.

“I’m so excited and grateful to be the recipient of this scholarship. This scholarship will be very helpful in paying for my education,” said Sudano. “It feels really great to be entering a profession that includes such quality people. I’ve already met so many helpful and encouraging reporters through interning.”

Each year, NCRF awards two $1,000 scholarships to students who have completed or are currently performing the required internship portion of their court reporting program. They must also meet other specific criteria, including current membership in NCRA, enrollment in an NCRA-certified court reporting program, and a GPA of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale. A generous annual donation from the Reis Family Foundation helps fund these scholarships. Keech and Sudano are the 23rd and 24th recipients of this award.

To learn more about NCRF’s scholarships, visit NCRA.org/NCRF/Scholarships.

NCRF announces deadline for student scholarship and grant

Nominations are now being accepted by the National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF) for the Student Intern Scholarship and Robert H. Clark Scholarship. The deadline for nominations is June 17.

Each year, NCRF awards two $1,000 scholarships to students who have completed or are currently performing the required internship portion of their court reporting program. They must also meet other specific criteria, including current membership in NCRA, having a grade point average of at least 3.5 on a 4.0 scale, and attending an NCRA-certified court reporting program. A generous annual donation from the Reis Family Foundation helps fund these scholarships.

The Robert H. Clark Scholarship, in its second year, is awarded in the amount of $1,800 each year through 2019. Court reporting students must be nominated by an instructor or advisor and meet a number of specific criteria to be eligible, including enrollment in an NCRA-certified court reporting program, passing at least one of the court reporting program’s Q&A tests at a minimum of 200 words per minute, having a GPA of 3.5 or above, demonstrating the need for financial assistance, and possessing the qualities exemplified by a professional court reporter, including attitude, demeanor, dress, and motivation.

“As a hardworking young woman trying to balance being in school full time, being available to assist my parents, and running my own home on a tight budget, the lack of available funds can be the source of much stress and worry,” said Chaya Shusterman, the recipient of the first-ever scholarship in 2015. “Thanks to the generosity of the Robert H. Clark Scholarship, I received the relief I needed at just the right time! Thank you so much for assisting me in my journey to achieve my goals. I am deeply grateful.”

This scholarship is named for the late Robert H. (Bob) Clark, a court reporter from Los Angeles, Calif., who was dedicated to preserving the history of the profession. In 1993, he donated his extensive collection of books, artifacts, and documents related to court reporting to NCRF to help establish a namesake library that is housed at NCRA headquarters in Reston, Va. This scholarship was made possible thanks to a generous donation by Donna Hamer, Clark’s cousin, made in 2015.

The recipients of these awards will be recognized at the 2016 NCRA Convention & Expo in Chicago, Ill.

To learn more about and apply for the Student Intern and Robert H. Clark scholarships, visit NCRA.org/NCRF.

National Court Reporters Foundation offers scholarships for student interns

The National Court Reporters Foundation opened nominations for its 2015 Student Intern Scholarship. The deadline to submit nominations is July 6. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must be NCRA members, enrolled in an NCRA-certified court reporter training program, and involved in the school’s internship program within the past year, among other criteria. Two winners will be selected by random drawing, and each will receive $1,000 to support them as they finish out their education.

“As a student who was the recipient of three different scholarships in my two and a half years in court reporting school, I was always baffled when I heard my fellow students say that they did not apply for a scholarship,” said Michael McMorran, a freelance court reporter from San Diego, Calif. “As someone who attended a school that was roughly $12,000 a year, I think a fair assumption would be that a good portion of the student population who attended were not paying out of pocket the entire tuition cost on a yearly basis.”

In the last 10 years, NCRF’s Student Intern Scholarship has aided dozens of students in their efforts to complete their court reporting education. The scholarship is supported by donations from NCRA members to the Foundation.

To be eligible, student nominees must also be interning in any of the following three career paths: judicial (official and freelance), CART, and captioning. A nominee in a judicial court reporting program must also have passed at least one of the program’s Q&A tests at a minimum of 190 words per minute, while a nominee in a CART or captioning program must have passed at least one of the program’s literary tests at a minimum of 160 words per minute.

Nominees for the NCRF Student Intern Scholarship must also have a grade point average of at least a 3.5 overall (based on a 4.0 standard or equivalent), demonstrate the need for financial assistance, and possess all the qualities exemplified by a professional court reporter, including professional attitude, demeanor, dress, and motivation. Finally, all criteria must be confirmed and verified by the submitting program.

“The absolute worst possible scenario that could come from applying for a scholarship such as the NCRF Student Intern Scholarship is that you don’t get it and it costs you nothing but a few minutes of your time to go through the application process,” McMorran said.

“However, more importantly, the best possible scenario that could come from applying for one of the many scholarships afforded to students within this scholastic field is a helpful sum of money made possible by those who know how hard it is to get through the financial burden of school as well as getting started in this amazing field,” he added.

The application for the 2015 NCRF Student Intern Scholarship is here. For more information about NCRF scholarships and grants, or to submit nominations, contact B.J. Shorak, NCRF’s Deputy Executive Director, at 800-272-6272, ext. 126, or by email at bjshorak@ncra.org.

NCRF supports the next generation of reporters

In 2014, NCRF awarded scholarships to three students and a grant to a new working court reporter. Two students, Kelly Greer of the Community College of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, Penn., and Rebecca Russo of Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, Ala., received NCRF’s Student Intern Scholarships; each received $1,000. Jessica D’Agostino of Lake Worth, Fla., was awarded NCRF’s 2014 Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship, and Shannon Bevin, a court reporter from Whitestone, N.Y., is the 2014 recipient of NCRF’s New Professional Reporter Grant; they each received $2,000. Read more.

NCRF announces 2014 NCRF Student Intern Scholarship recipients

NCRF awards two $1,000 Student Intern Scholarships annually, selected by random drawing. Students must have completed or be currently performing the required internship portion of their court reporting program, among other requirements. Kelly Greer of the Community College of Allegheny County, Pittsburgh, Penn., and Rebecca Russo of Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, Ala., are this year’s winners.

For more information about NCRF scholarships and awards, click here.