NCRF announces winners of Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship and Student Intern Scholarships

The National Court Reporters Foundation (NCRF) has announced that Jared Orozco, a student from Sheridan Technical College in Hollywood, Fla., was named recipient of the 2017 Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship. The Foundation also announced that Summer Vaughan, a student from College of Court Reporting in Valparaiso, Ind., and Analisa Arnold from Gadsden State Community College in Gadsden, Ala., are the recipients of the 2017 Student Intern Scholarships.

Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship

“I chose to be a court reporter because I wanted a job that has a relatively flexible schedule to permit me to do volunteer work and dedicate time to being a minister,” said Orozco. “After I finish school, my ultimate goal would be to work in transcribing sermons to expedite their translation so it can be of benefit to people all over the world.” He plans to use the scholarship funds to purchase a much-needed computer as well as CAT software.

Jared Orozco

The Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship is a $2,000 award, given annually to a high-achieving court reporting student. This scholarship honors the late Frank Sarli, a court reporter who was committed to supporting students through years of service on NCRA’s committees and boards that guide the education of court reporting students. Recipients are nominated by their schools and must meet specific criteria, including:

  • having a GPA of at least 3.5
  • passing at least one of the court reporting program’s Q&A tests at a minimum of 200 wpm
  • possessing all the qualities exemplified by a professional court reporter, including professional attitude, demeanor, dress, and motivation

“When called upon to read back in class, Jared summons his talent to imitate accents, ranging from Darth Vader to Southern drawl, to amuse and enthrall his classmates. However, when it comes to integrity, honesty, professionalism, and altruism, Jared is very serious,” said Aurora Joslyn, CRI, an instructor at Sheridan Technical College. Joslyn added: “Now, thanks to the Frank Sarli Memorial Scholarship award, Jared can proudly take his place among the ranks of professional court reporters equipped with the tools for success.”

Student Intern Scholarships

Summer Vaughan

“Court reporting has always been the one job that has stuck out in my mind as my ‘dream job.’ I was always discouraged from going into this career because people are very misinformed about the opportunities available for a court reporter,” said Vaughan, who had pursued a paralegal degree before entering court reporting. “Once I began my court reporting internship, I knew I was right where I had always wanted to be. The reporters I interned with have been so welcoming, helpful, and encouraging. Nearly all of them have continued to follow my journey and have cheered me on every step of the way.” Vaughan plans to put the scholarship funds towards professional software and certification fees.

“Summer will be a successful professional because she has grit. She not only has the skill but the mental fortitude, determination, and desire to be an outstanding court reporter. That same grit or perseverance that took her through court reporting school with honors will be what propels her into a highly accomplished career,” said Nicky Rodriquez, the director of admissions at College of Court Reporting. “Summer is very deserving of this scholarship and will, without a doubt, make a positive impact on the court reporting profession for years to come.”

The Student Intern Scholarship is a $1,000 award, given annually to two high-achieving court reporting students who have completed the internship portion of their education. Recipients are nominated by their schools and must meet specific criteria, including:

  • having a GPA of at least 3.5
  • passing at least one of the program’s Q&A tests at a minimum of 190 wpm (if pursuing judicial reporting) or at least one literary test at a minimum of 160 wpm (if pursuing captioning)
  • possessing all the qualities exemplified by a professional court reporter, including professional attitude, demeanor, dress, and motivation

Analisa Arnold

“Not only is the internship experience a great opportunity for easing fears a student may have about moving from the educational environment to the professional realm, but it also gives an in-depth chance to experience the multifaceted scene of court reporting. The most important lesson I learned from my internship process is court reporting is more than just a job; it’s a rewarding career opportunity that benefits so many people,” said Arnold. She plans to put the scholarship funds toward the start-up costs as she moves forward as a professional.

“Analisa Arnold is a well-rounded young lady who has high ambitions and this keeps her motivated to persevere through all the ups and downs as a reporting student,” said Michelle Roberts, CRI, an instructor at Gadsden State Community College. “Her practice habits throughout her stint here in school will assure her a great career as a realtime writer. Her precise writing style will assure her a big platform to display her talents in this field.”

Dom Tursi honored with Santo J. Aurelio Award for Altruism

TursiLong-time NCRA member Dom Tursi, CM, was named recipient of the Santo J. Aurelio Award for Altruism during a special awards luncheon held at the Association’s 2015 Convention & Expo held July 30-Aug. 1 in New York City. Members of the 2015 class of the Academy of Professional Reporters, NCRF intern scholarship winners, and Bonni R. Shuttleworth, CRI, CPE, recipient of the 2015 CASE Award of Excellence, were also honored at the luncheon, along with Josephine Nosker, Tracey Tracy, Angeli English as the winners of the CASE essay scholarship.

The award is presented by the NCRF and is given to a working court reporter with more than five decades of experience who has given back to the profession and to the court reporting community with no expectation of any reward.

Tursi, an official court reporter from Central Islip, N.Y., has worked as a freelance reporter, an official court reporter, and a videographer. He has also been a partner in a firm, opened his own firm, founded a court reporting school, taught court reporting, provided closed captioning for clients, and reported proceedings in at least a half-dozen countries. Tursi is also the author of a number monographs and has served in many capacities at the local, state, and national levels, logging thousands of volunteer hours on behalf of court reporting.

A long-time supporter of the profession and students, he has shared his expertise as a seminar presenter for his state association and law firms, and as a lecturer and mentor to countless students. He is also a national and multi-state winner of numerous speed contests in Literary, Legal Opinion, and Q&A, and has also provided live dictation numerous times for NCRA for the RPR and other tests.

As part of NCRA’s People to People program, he served as an ambassador to China in 2007 and is credited with creating a true respect between the American and the Chinese court reporting communities.

In September 2010, he opened the Gallery of Shorthand in his own courthouse, a museum-like venue that showcases the history of the court reporting profession. The museum and its collection of artifacts are considered to be that of Smithsonian quality.

NCRF announces 2015 Student Intern Scholarship recipients

The National Court Reporters Foundation has announced that Katherine Schilling of West Valley College, Saratoga, Calif., and Elizabeth Vanghelof of Atlantic Technical Center, Coconut Creek, Fla., are the winners of its 2015 Student Intern Scholarships. Schilling and Vanghelof will be recognized at a special awards luncheon at the 2015 NCRA Convention & Expo being held in New York City July 30-Aug. 2.

Each year, NCRF draws randomly from nominations that have been submitted two winners to each receive a $1,000 scholarship to support them as they finish out their educations. To be eligible, nominees must be NCRA members, enrolled in an NCRA-certified court reporter training program, and involved in the school’s internship program within the past year, among other criteria.

In the last 10 years, NCRF’s Student Intern Scholarship has aided dozens of students in their efforts to complete their court reporting education. The scholarship is supported by donations from NCRA members to the Foundation.

To be eligible, student nominees must also be interning in any of the following three career paths: judicial (official and freelance), CART, and captioning. A nominee in a judicial court reporting program must also have passed at least one of the program’s Q&A tests at a minimum of 190 words per minute, while a nominee in a CART or captioning program must have passed at least one of the program’s literary tests at a minimum of 160 words per minute.

Nominees for the NCRF Student Intern Scholarship must also have a grade point average of at least a 3.5 overall (based on a 4.0 standard or equivalent), demonstrate the need for financial assistance, and possess all the qualities exemplified by a professional court reporter, including professional attitude, demeanor, dress, and motivation. Finally, all criteria must be confirmed and verified by the submitting program.

For more information about NCRF scholarships and grants, or to submit nominations, contact B.J. Shorak, NCRF’s Deputy Executive Director, at 800-272-6272, ext. 126, or by email at bjshorak@ncra.org.